MBBS (Hons) Medicine and Surgery

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

Medicine at Newcastle Univeristy is really exciting and completely different to what I expected it to be.I expected the course to full of nerds and noone to be sociable. But it's completely different. Everyone is so friendly and kind and Medsoc at Newcastle on a Friday night is a must.We have exams in November, January and May, so it means working solidly throughout the year. I would have preferred all exams to be at the end of the year.The course is integrated so offers a real mixture of lectures, seminars and hands on practicals. We have around 2 hours of practicals every 2 weeks where we get to practice clinical skills such as blood talking and respiratory exams.Results of exams are posted online and are available within days of sitting your exams.The teachers are all very approachable and very easy to contact via email.The only downside to the course are the assignments. We have to do 3 throughout the year and they are such a pain.Throughout year 1, you also get to visit a pregnant woman at her home 3 times and then you will have to do an assignment on her feelings etc. Visiting the pregnant mum gives you really good experience in handling real life patients and improves your communication skills greatly.Overall, Newcastle has great teaching facilities, both practical and academic. It is a great vibrant city with so much to do and never ending fun.

Anonymous

Medicine is an inherently difficult subject with a massive breadth of learning that needs to be done. The course at Newcastle aims to break this up in Years 1 and 2 by tying them to hypothetical cases that are based in the real world. This kind of teaching got me to focus on the important stuff without getting bogged down in the details. However, when it got to more abstract subjects (for example, the nuts and bolts of biochemistry) I found the link to be fairly tenuous or ignored and as a result the teaching was quite boring.In Year 3 the course is taught entirely within a healthcare setting (GP and Hospital) with an emphasis on applying the knowledge accrued in Years 1 and 2 to clinical practise. As a result this year was a lot more fun and engaging while also really making it feel like I was learning. However, the teaching was spread across a number of sites and a few were more capable at teaching than others with the types of patients being available. Furthermore, a lot of the best teaching tended to be ad hoc from F1s and F2s on wards rather than the structured teaching session meaning their may be an asymmetry in learning (I was lucky to have a lot of great teachers around me). Year 4 can be described as the best and worst academic year mixed together. Term 1 has a massive emphasis on learning difficult, detailed and sometimes abstract information in an incredibly dense and lecture heavy format. The pretence of tying it to cases is completely gone and it is very much throw everything against a wall and see what sticks (hoping that at least half will and you'll pass the exam at Christmas). This is particularly tough if you're placed in a bad group for the seminar work as a large chunk of learning should be done here. The second half of Year 4 is a lot better with it being clinical work in fields that you have chosen. I had the luck of being involved in a research project where the goal was a publication and another audit which was presented as a poster at a national conference. This allowed me to specialise earlier while also working within the NHS. Finally, the year ends with a two month elective where I was able to travel abroad and learn how medicine works in lower income settings, a very valuable experience. Outside of the course there are a couple of issues with administration with there being fairly frequent delays in grading assessments and then releasing them (something which is particularly annoying when you need to have a meeting with a member of staff if you've failed). Furthermore, there can be a lot of confusion during the transition to clinical teaching with Consultants not being informed of their teaching duties or not informing the medical school that they are unavailable. This has led to a few sessions cancelled after an hour delay, time which could've been spent learning something else. The assessment themselves are split between multiple choice exams, practical exams and course work (specifically essay writing regarding patient experiences, ethical dilemmas and advances in research). These assessments are fairly standard with the practical exams and some of the course work proving to be interesting and fun. However, it can be somewhat nervewracking to be stumped during a practical exam in front of an assessor and a patient, both of which are fully aware that you've made a mistake or don't know what to do. Overall, I'd definitely recommend Newcastle University for Medicine. It is well taught, well respected and gives you the tools you need to go out and be a doctor.

Anonymous

Really interesting course, uses cases rather than patients to guide learning. There is a lot of anatomy experience and lots of good clinical skills teaching also. The assessments are also fairly straightforward with mainly multiple choice and single-best-answer questions. Really great city too with a fantastic student life!

Anonymous

Very interesting and fulfilling degree. Lots of early clinical experience. Although 1st and second year is a lot of lectures etc in 3rd year you get to spend all your time in clinical environments which is very rewarding. Couldn't think of a better place to study.

Anonymous

Really good teaching structure. Lots of clinical experience and also a good amount of anatomy. Testing is also well structured

Anonymous

Medicine at Newcastle is taught very well, through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical sessions. If you learn well by listening to lectures, great, but if you'd rather have loads of groupwork then this might not be ideal. I love that we get taught clinical skills from first year, since actually doing cool doctor-y stuff is the most interesting part. The course is hard, but that's mainly due to the sheer volume, rather than complexity, of what we have to learn.

Anonymous

The course at newcastle is an integrated course and places emphasis on understanding the theory as opposed to 'learning and churning'. There is very little anatomy teaching but it is well taught. Lectures are well structured and well delivered. The course takes a systematic approach

Anonymous

Really good integrated degree, spiral learning path so you learn a new concept, come back to it, build up, come back to it again. Nice balance of modules in pre-clinical stages and the clinical base units are well set up and the standard of teaching is very high. Staff are very friendly and willing to take time outside lectures to help with any problems!

Anonymous

Really well structured medical degree with clinical contact from day 1. Plus the best city in the UK.

Anonymous

Really challenging degree and very easy to get overwhelmed with work, however the support in place at the university is fantastic to deal with this. Really varied course with lots of patient interaction, hospital and GP visit, time in the dissecting room and very interactive lectures. They are also very progressive in terms of learning style, having all the lectures recorded and uploaded online so that you can learn when and where you want.

Anonymous

Highly stimulating coursework with interesting assignments that develops your critical analysis and teaches you to understand the multi-factorial concept of health. Also equips you with the skills to be a good doctor, with the skills to communicate well with patients on top of the knowledge required to diagnose them.

Anonymous

Course: 5 year lecture based, systems based. We have lectures in the medical school in years 1 and 2. In year 3 and 5 we do rotations in the hospitals around Newcastle, Northumbria, Durham, Sunderland and Middlesborough depending on which trust you're assigned to. In year 4 we have a special 'mini elective' period where you do 3 blocks of 6 weeks each on any specialty or anything medical-related, and one 8 week elective that you can do anywhere in the world. Basically it's very interesting and offers a lot of choice and flexibility. Teaching: The core teaching staff and lecturers are really dedicated. There is an online forum and resource website which is updated daily. The library resources and facilities are great and more than enough to supplement your learning. You get your own personal tutor throughout the 5 years to help you out with things outside the course as well. Exams: Are mostly MCQ based and we have Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) like every medical school which starts from year 1, so you get exposure to it right away which is good.

Anonymous

The degree itself is very, very difficult - but absolutely fantastic. The staff give lots of support, both for academic and personal problems, and there are plenty of external resources for us to go to. We get thrown straight into the deep end with an immediate exam in October of Stage 1, which gave us good feedback as to whether or not our revision strategies were working. We get given freedom with the GP and Hospital visits that we must undertake, and the 'family study' that is given is a fantastic opportunity to help us transition from 'students' to 'Medical students'.