BMBS (Hons) Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

I really enjoy my degree as I have contact with patients from virtually day 1. This means I have been able to develop my communication skills and am constantly reminded about the relevance of learning all the anatomy and physiology theory. I have loved spending years 3 and 4 on the wards and the staff welcome you into their team. I have spent these years based at the hospital in Truro. All the staff are extremely friendly and I love being so close to such good beaches.The staff at the medical school are extremely helpful and supportive and I honestly couldn't fault them.Overall, I have loved my time at Exeter!!

Anonymous

The course is a PBL (problem based learning) format for the first 2 years, then is clinically based for years 3-5. Exeter medical school has an Exeter campus and a Truro campus. Everyone will spend at least 1 year in Truro, either years 3/4 or year 5. This is a great opportunity to see how things differ in different trusts and hospitals during your program of study, as well as a chance to experience and explore the beautiful south west.

Anonymous

The aspects of this degree at this university that I enjoyed are: the course content and structure; variety of placements; school's openness to newer forms of education; school's attitude to feedback from students; friendliness and approachability of most staff. Areas that could be improved are: learning resources and lack of detailed feedback for students. We could also do with more contact times with our academic tutors, but not more paperwork! Where the university is seriously deficient is the quality and quanitty of teaching: clearly this needs significantly more input.

Anonymous

The A100 Medicine course at the University of Exeter is very interactive and stimulating, especially due to its problem-based learning structure. The syllabus is divided into two-week case unit rotations where each case unit focuses on a specific age of a patient chronologically from birth to old age, i.e. fetal case unit, childhood case unit, young adult case unit, etc. For each case unit, you and seven other students (which forms a PBL group) has a scenario focusing on a specific patient. For example, for Childhood, "Johnny is an 8 year old boy who broke his arm," and from these scenarios you derive questions to answer as a group, i.e. "What is the functional anatomy of the upper limb?" A week later, you and your PBL group meet again to discuss and answer all the questions together. Every two weeks, you also have tutorials (called Life Science Resource Center), lectures, clinical skills at the hospital and workshops. Each session is very informative and the variety of learning styles suits students who may learn in different ways. I love the structure of the course and prefer it to traditional lecture-based learning in more old-fashioned medical universities like Oxbridge. The teaching style at Exeter is truly modern and integrates lots of technology.

Anonymous

My Medicine degree at Exeter University uses a Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach and is broken up into two week blocks. Every two weeks we get a case which we discuss in small groups and pick apart the core and accessory subjects and formulate our own questions so we can direct what we learn. Each case has an underlying theme such as a particular disease or part of the body. The lectures and teaches we receive throughout the two weeks are centred around the case and what we should be learning from it. At the end of each term we have a consolidation week where we go over the cases we have seen and iron out any misunderstandings and gaps in our knowledge. The two week chunks make it very manageable and prevent stress building up. In these two weeks we also have Clinical Skills small group teaches where we learn a skill that was mentioned in the case and that we may see in practice.Regularly throughout the year we have clinical placements in GP practices, which allows us to observe things we learn in class and get to put our clinical learning to the test. If you are lucky you will be able to take a history from a patient or conduct a skill, such as taking blood!A couple of times per year we have Special Study Units, where we have some opinion over what we want to study for three weeks and produce a 2000 word essay at the end of it. I have been lucky enough to be shadowing surgeons for three weeks on two occasions and write a report on one of the conditions I have seen.Exeter is an excellent university with many resources. Although the anatomy teaching isn't great it produces excellent clinicians with alot more patient contact and clinical skills than other universities.

Anonymous

Our student selected components have a lot of flexibility and choice in them. The structure is based on life cycles, from infancy to elderly care. The course gets more difficult every year but I feel that we are prepared for this. The teaching is not as good as it could be, however because the school is small, you are able to talk to your teachers. We are assessed on our medical knowledge, clinical skills and professionalism. I really enjoy the course, and I like the fact that we don't have many lectures as I feel that the quality of our lectures could be improved.

Anonymous

Medicine at the University of Exeter is a Problem Based Learning course. Which translates to less lectures and more small group problem solving. 1st and 2nd year are mostly campus based with occasional clinical content within some modules. 3rd, 4th and 5th year are Clinical years where 5 days a week are spend in hospital. Assessment is through 4 multiple choice exams each year and written essays. My favourite part of the course is interacting with patients and gaining an insight into their life.

Anonymous

I am in my second year of study. The content and structure of the course is very well thought out. It helps to give me all the necessary details and information, and facilitate your my self learning. Alongside this you get to have a go at mock clinical procedures, as preparation for next year when we will have to do it in hospital. This is one of the best aspects of the course in my opinion, as they really help you out with it, it is really practical, and not many other universities teach it so early on. You get examined on these clinical procedures every so often, with the chance to retake, and we have a big exam on many of them at the end of this year. The only negative about the clinical skills teaching is that it can be taught/examined slightly different depending on the clinician teaching you, and therefore can sometimes be a little subjective. The course is rather complex, but if you are good enough to get on to it then you will do fine. The uni wants you to pass. Sometimes you will have to do extra work however, as medicine is so big and our regular (termly) exams are on everything medical. In these you are graded compared to how well everyone in your year has done too, so if your year group has a good medical knowledge then you may have to work hard to get a good grade. Overall the teaching is good, we have doctors come in and teach. Sometimes there are a few too many pointless lectures, and we are expected to go to most of our sessions (with admin being quite strict on attendance) but overall the course is really good.

Anonymous

Our medical degree is PBL (Problem Based Learning) orientated, supported by diverse and varying clinical exposure and informative lectures. Medicine is undoubtedly an exceedingly tough course. However the support network provided by the school and those organised by the student body makes taking your BMBS at Exeter a treasured experience.

Anonymous

The medicine degree structure is not traditional like some other universities which makes it really exciting and allows for many different learning styles. No two days in the week are the same as there is a mixture of small group learning, clinical skills, placements and lectures in the pre-clinical years. Clinical years are really hands on with placements in the hospitals and community with loads of opportunity for patient contact from day 1 of year 1.Assessment consists of an applied medical knowledge test 4 times every year with the hope of showing progression as you acquire knowledge. We also undertake research and clinical projects that you produce reports for with many people going on to publish their pieces.It is a really fun interesting course and place to be with loads always going on academically and socially!

Anonymous

I feel our medical school has a good way of delivering our degree. It's a PBL degree so it encourages you to work in teams and do your own self study. There are limited lectures so you have more time for studying things that interest you as well as the core subjects. It is a hard degree but the assessment is explained to you from the start and we are given extensive mark schemes so we know exactly what our markers want from us. I've really enjoyed this course and the cyclical nature of it concretes the learning.

Anonymous

Pros:- Very good clinical integration early on, which builds up year on year. By year 3 you are in hospitals frequently learning under consultants and other medical professions, which is a massive preparation for the F1 junior doctor job.- UEMS are really good at looking after their students, there assign you an academic tutor, a pastoral tutor, and they put a lot of emphasis on seeking help from various people if you do not feel that you are coping, whether that be socially or academically.- Quite a unique course structure takes the burden off passing single modules for topics and puts more of an emphasis of learning a little bit each time. Topics are often revisited throughout the 5 year course structure and the structure is designed so that you remember topics easier since you go over them multiple times rather than learning the whole of anatomy before your anatomy module exam and then never touching it again.Cons:- When first starting the course, it can be rather difficult to come to grasp with the course structure concept. Often students are left alone to do the majority of studying through 'self directed learning' periods and common questions include "Am I learning too much about this." or "Am I learning the correct topics.". These questions become answered as the course progresses and as a student you have to guage at the right level of learning. On the plus side though, this prepares you for life as a doctor as these are the questions you will have to ask yourself about your learning once you have left university.- No dissection for students. A big miss when potential students browse the medical school catalog and it would be nice to have some, but it is not the end of the world not having it. One thing that might catch students off a bit is the so-called 'lack of thorough anatomy teaching' but rest assured that they teach us the amount of anatomy needed to know in order to do the job as a future doctor. Most doctors do not frequently need to know the entire anatomical workings of the human body on a daily basis and this is reflected in the amount of time of teaching for this topic.

Anonymous

I love my course. I am in my 3rd year now which means I have a huge amount of contact with patients and this makes learning stimulating and engaging. For example, I go to placement at a GP and am given my own room to see patients which is reviewed by the doctor.The course is very varied which combines lectures, clinical skills teaching, placement in hospital and primary care as well as small group sessions.I am assessed at multiple points throughout the year and different types of exams assess different skills. I constantly recieve feedback on my performance and get a lot of time to speak with consultants which is really valuable.

Anonymous

The course at Exeter is very self directed, as we don't have many lectures. This means we have a lot of small group teaching, which is good. We have a placement and two clinical skills sessions every two weeks. This makes what we learn a lot more interesting and relevant.

Anonymous

A great course with placements and patient contact from the first year. 3rd-4th years are 80% clinical, allowing you to learn in a practical environments from healthcare professionals in a variety of settings. The course does require that every student spends at least 1 of the 5 years in a different locality, but there are both pros and cons to this.

Anonymous

In the first two years of the course, the course takes a two week PBL course structure. You work through a PBL case in groups, formulate questions about the case and go away and learn the answers. You then meet again in the next week to go through the answers together. As well as that, you have about 8 lectures, 2 life science resources centre sessions, 2 clinical skills sessions, a workshop, a PPG session and a clinical placement. This is different to the more traditional approach as it steers away from formal lecture based learning and focuses more on group learning and self directed learning. Early patient contact is really good and makes your clinical years (3,4 and 5) that bit easier. In those years, you rotate between specialities and feedback patient cases that you have seen at the end of each week. Medical knowledge is assessed by a 1 off end of year one examination and four applied medical knowledege tests every year which are progess tests. Clinical skills are assessed by in vitro and in vivo competencies through the year and OSCEs at the end of year 2 and year 4. You also do a number of special study units thoughout the years where you have to do projects and scientific reports. Your professionalism is always being assessed, in every session, every placement, attendance etc. 

Anonymous

We get a lot of feedback on all the essays we do, which is really helpful to improve your work. I also think there is a good academic support and due to the small group learning you never feel lost. The placements from first year are also very good, to put your learning into context.

Anonymous

The University of Exeter's course in medicine is thorough and engaging. The first two years provide the basic science training you need for your three following clinical years, and the support is excellent. The teaching quality varies on location, but is largely quite good.

Anonymous

The course at Exeter is very self directed, thus we have less lectures and more small group problem solving work. This has its advantages and disadvantages ( it's called PBL if you want to research it more). I enjoy the PBL a lot more than i thought i would.

Anonymous

Studying medicine in Exeter is quite different to other courses. Firstly, you are given clinical experience and gain communication skills from the first weeks of medical school instead of having a split pre-clinical/clinical course. Not only is this extremely fun, but it allows you to become comfortable talking to patients and learning skills, alongside learning the nitty-gritty science and social aspects of the area of medicine on which you are focusing for that case unit. Many of the sessions are taught in small groups, which means you can discuss your thoughts and ideas with your peers, and gain further insight. This also allows you to ask your tutor questions, and get the most out of your contact session. I would recommend the course to anyone!

Anonymous

Studying medicine in Exeter is quite different to other courses. Firstly, you are given clinical experience and gain communication skills from the first weeks of medical school instead of having a split pre-clinical/clinical course. Not only is this extremely fun, but it allows you to become comfortable talking to patients and learning skills, alongside learning the nitty-gritty science and social aspects of the area of medicine on which you are focusing for that case unit. Many of the sessions are taught in small groups, which means you can discuss your thoughts and ideas with your peers, and gain further insight. This also allows you to ask your tutor questions, and get the most out of your contact session. I would recommend the course to anyone!

Anonymous

The structure of the course is very easy to follow due to the use of problem based learning and units where the course is divided into different scenarios and body systems. Lectures make up around 33% of the course material but most of the course is focused on group discussions, workshops, community placements shadowing other healthcare professionals and clinical sessions where you learn to do practical skills such as taking blood or carrying out physical examinations. It's all very exciting and worth it! 

Anonymous

"This degree course is incredibly manageable compared to other medicine courses. I have friends who are at other universities and they are constantly complaining about their workload and how they do not feel that they are supported. This is not the case with Medicine at Exeter. The workload is high, but i've never felt that it is unmanageable. Also, the level of academic support is exceptional. Overall, the course is structured in a very good way and learning through case studies is very effective. The only improvement I could suggest would be to have more teaching based on anatomy."