MBBS Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

Medicine is as hard as they say it is. Often, it is not the content or the concept itself that is hard but it is the volume of material that you need to learn and be able to recall at any point. At UCL the course is largely lecture based and you can have 5-6 lectures a day. If you cannot keep focused for that long or you fall asleep in lectures this might not be the right course type for you. The course itself is I would say excellent because we have the first two years that are al about the fundamentals of science, then we get to do an iBSc in our third year and then the last 3 years are the clinical years. We are lucky enough to be able to do full body dissections (one of the very few medical schools that still do this) which really helps when having to learn all the anatomy. We also get CPP teaching (Clinical and Professional Practice) which is the non sciency bit of medicine including ethics and law, evidence based medicine, professionalism, communication skills, statistics etc. Overall it is a great course. It is impossible to be bored of it and it is impossible to say that what you are learning is not interesting or useful. My advice is if you want to do it for yourself and because it will make you happy and you have a genuine interest in medicine then do it but if you are only doing it because you are pressurised (by parents) or for the money, then it is NOT worth it. Trust me, when it comes down to it you need to be able to remind yourself what you want to do in life cause there will be times when you will have existential crises and breakdowns during your time at medical school and the only person that will be able to help you get through these is yourself. So, listen to you and what you want and enjoy it. It goes waay faster than you'd think and it will be the most satisfying thing you will do...eventually!

Anonymous

The UCL MBBS course is well taught. It takes a traditional structure with 3 years of preclinical teaching (including an integrated BSc year) and 3 years of clinical teaching.The preclinical years are divided into systems based modules such as 'Circulation and Breathing' and 'Neuroscience and Behaviour'. The teaching is delivered in a variety of formats - including lectures, small group computer sessions and tutorials - by experts in the fields such as practising physicians as well as researchers. Assessment is in the form of Single Best Answer papers at the end of the first two years.Clinical teaching is carried out in a range of hospitals across London and is done both at the bedside and in lecture/seminar format. Placements are also undertaken at DGHs and GP practices. Assessment takes the form of written papers as well as practical examinations culminating in finals at the end of the final year. Students are also encouraged to take an 8 week elective period to develop their clinical skills before qualifying as a doctor.

Anonymous

It's a 6 year degree. The first 2 years are pre clinical so mostly consist of lectures although there are a few clinical experiences interspersed throughout. The second year academically is quite tough with a lot of lectures. The third year, you don't study medicine but study an iBsc for which there are a lot of different options. The fourth fifth and sixth years are clinical which you spend mostly in the hospital where you are taught there. There are few lectures then and most of the teaching is done by doctors

Anonymous

My experiences studying Medicine at UCL so far have been incredible. It is a lecture based course, so you would have to be suited to this style of teaching to make the most from it. The teaching here is truly to a very very high standard, and the professors teaching you are leaders in their field. The first 3 years are pre-clinical, and mostly lecture based whilst the last 3 years will be based in hospitals.

Anonymous

It is a well-designed course in terms of structure and feedback is asked for at many opportunities. The teaching is second to none, often from world-leading professors and clinicians. Slides and associated lecture notes are very comprehensive. The clinical teaching is of a high standard at world-famous hospitals. There is a lot of integration between the years, often through sports and societies. The medics union is very strong and stands up for students against the university, far more than societies for any other department. Assessment is fair, by way of four exams in first year with two formative (mocks) beforehand to prepare students. Clinical years are assessed by practical exams (OCaPEs). Academic support is there if you ask for it, however awareness of it could be improved.

Anonymous

I study Medicine. The main method of teaching is lectures and there are a few tutorials. We also do a lot of practical work in labs. My favourite part is the sessions where we get to meet and talk to patients. Assessment is through exams only at the end of the year, i really like this because it means we don't have exams throughout the year which can be really stressful.Medicine is a really tough subject, and has to be approached with the right mindstead, it is important to make sure you're able to organise your time and priorities your commitments. Also it is important that you are doing it for the right reasons, only study medicine if you are passionate about it and enjoy it, because that will be your motivation to get through the stressful schedules and workload.

Anonymous

Medicine is a very hard degree to undertake however it is an important and rewading degree, The teaching at UCL is great and I really enjoy the fact that after every module we complete we have mock assessments to help us determine our weaknesses in vertain topics.

Anonymous

Lets start with the not so good - The timetable is like no other - regular 9am starts and ending at 6. Hard exams - but what isn't hard.However i wouldn't swap my course in for a guaranteed First with honours in another degree.Now onto the good - Ive met patients that even though they don't have the most rare to interesting illness, have changed the way i perceive my future. The course has a mix of patient and human interaction, ethics and law which is so interesting and contemporary as to this day abortion law is being debated in parliament. The course takes you to the forefront of leading and up to date science, as what use would it be to teach Doctors old neurology. Also throughout the year you choose 2 'student selected components' or SSC's. The SSC is on a friday afternoon and each has an exam or essay of some sort at the end but they're more enjoyable than challenging. SSC choices range from Physics of medicine, To beginners Arabic or Level 8 advanced German. They also include Philosophy of medicine and a course on Leadership and management for your own practise. these mean that you get a good balance alongside the hardcore science.

Anonymous

Medicine is one of the most interesting degrees to study. Being able to study the human body is a privilege and the complexity of the human body never fails to surprise you. As one may expect it is a difficult course, but as with anything if you have a passion for the subject that should not put you off . At UCL the course is traditional (so not much clinical contact in the 1st 2-3 years) and we study the body by system (i.e. cardiovascular then neuro etc). The teaching is good, we are taught by experts in the field. Of course you get the occasional lecturer who would rather not be there but overall you cannot complain. We are assessed by SBAs (single best answer) and data interpretation, all at the end of the year. Overall I am enjoying the degree, but if you are considering medicine I would say you must be 100% certain and committed or you may struggle.

Anonymous

It is good enough so far. The staffs of the faculty provide me with enough help in time and the housing office is of good assistance as well. However, my favourite part of the university is still the prestigious professors and the wonderful materials that they offer.

Anonymous

The way the course is taught at UCL is amazing! There's a variety of full body dissections for anatomy, virtual simulations, lectures and for physiology there are tutorials, lab sessions and lectures! As with any medical school, the sheer amount of content they throw at you is ridiculous but there's so much support from older students - you get assigned "medic parents", a personal tutor (who sees you 3 times a year in your first year), a transition mentor (who helps you learn course content for the first term) and a tutor in one of the clinical modules who's also there to help. The ways of assessments are through multiple choice questions and anatomy spotter in the first year. But there's soooo many societies to get involved in UCL as well - so despite it being difficult to establish a work life balance, it's definitely possible!

Anonymous

I enjoy studying Medicine at UCL because I really enjoy the london location and it does have a campus feel most other london universities don't. I feel the medical course is quite badly organised. There should definitely be more tutorials to consolidate fundamental learning points of the module and the personal tutor system is pointless because they don't know much about the degree so they can't offer any guidance. There could also be more relation to the science we're learning to a clinical setting - they have the occasional more integrative lectures but most of the time it's hard to relate some of the science to how it'll actually be used. The anatomy teaching in the labs is good and I enjoy dissection with cadavers. Currently I am only second year so it should be more exciting once I'm in clinical years.

Anonymous

I have really enjoyed my time at UCL (I have been there for the 3 clinical years after transferring from Cambridge, where I did the pre-clinical part of the medicine course). I have been based at 4 different hospitals and had exposure to a wide range of medical and surgical specialties, from the more common ones like A&E or cardiology to paediatrics and a student-selected component in global health. The teaching is generally good - a lot of it is on the wards or in the hospital you're based at. Sometimes learning clinical medicine is frustrating because you do spend a lot of time feeling not very useful or because doctors forget they were scheduled for bedside teaching with students, but book learning can't really make up for time of the wards so there's not much way around it (and my impression is that this is common to most med schools rather than being particularly about UCL). Another thing to be aware of is that the years at UCL medical school are very big (particularly in the clinical years) which can make it harder to get to know people as you're often with different people for different placements. But that tends not to matter too much and it's been a great experience overall.

Anonymous

The course is structured in such a way that we mostly use lectures, which is supplemented by practical classes, tutorials and sometimes computer aided sessions to help learn. We also learn anatomy, beginning in second term. It is useful in a way that allows you to structure your learning, and know what you should learn, but unfortunately the workload can be quite hard and you can often fall behind - it's important to study effectively to do well. Feedback is not as good, though we have mocks in November and February which are very useful. Finally the clinical part of the course is good - once a week we have a session dedicated to this which can help make medicine seem more relatable to what you learn.

Anonymous

There are two main components to the course: 1) the general science background and medical knowledge and 2) the broader aspects of knowledge you need to be a doctor, such as professionalism, ethics, knowledge of certain law, safeguarding, reasoning skills, assessing evidence (e.g. journals). UCL does very well in the league tables and is generally considered to be a very academic university. I've found it to be a very challenging course (I'm studying as a graduate so have done a previous degree) but I think as hard as it is now, it is preparing me well to be a good doctor. I've heard that people tend to like employing UCL doctors as they're very rounded because the course is not just purely focused on the academic side - there's a lot of developing communication and professional skills too.

Anonymous

The course at UCL is excellent. The course content is basic sciences for the first 2 years, however clinical exposure is incorporated to prepare you patient contact and future scenarios you will be faced with. The assessment is useful as you are assessed at the end of each module in a formative exam. This is used to track your progress however if you don't do well it is okay since these exams are purely to track progress. The exams in the summer are what determine your progression to the next year, as well as your portfolio.

Anonymous

Structure: Teaching is system-based meaning we are taught about body systems such as the cardiopulmonary systems, learning all of the the anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, biochemistry, genetics and clinical skills relevant to that system. This means anatomy etc. becomes functional, with an obvious relevance, and it's easy to integrate clinical skills such as chest examinations with the topic, enabling students to get comfortable examining people (generally actors are employed to pose as patients) while understanding the relevance of our lectures to the profession.Our course content is mainly delivered through lectures, which are all available online, and there are small group work sessions, workshops, tutorials, quizzes and self-paced learning exercises to assist our understanding of the material. UCL teaches anatomy through dissection and computer aided learning which are both extremely useful resources. Dissection is extremely useful as it shows the variation in each human and how difficult it is to recognise different structures as they are not orderly and ideal as they are in textbook diagrams.We are assessed at the end of the year on everything we have learnt and that's the only assessment that really counts. So there aren't many deadlines and it can be easy to procrastinate, but we do have formative assessments in november and february to keep us on track and show our progress.I think it's well organised and the lecturers are important researchers and clinicians in their respective fields, and it's an incredible opportunity to be able to learn from these people. There are some components in the clinical skills sessions that I feel can be condensed sometimes, but they are important so maybe there is a reason for the emphasis that I'm not able to appreciate yet. Overall, I've enjoyed the course so far and I think it's been delivered well.

Anonymous

A good variety of traditional and PBL teaching, as well as some patient exposure from Year 1. There is excellent support from older students and this is facilitated by clubs and societies. Teaching is variable as with any course, but core lecturers are usually very good.

Anonymous

The course is 6 years long with the first two years being heavily lecture based. The third year is where you do an intercalated bsc, where you will be able to develop further insight into a particular topic, such as global health. Years 4-6 are your clinical years, where you will be situated at a hospital and gain experience of what it will actually be like to be a doctor.

Anonymous

Organised, full of content and (enjoyable). could have more assitance and guidance by giving us more notes. it is quite complex based on the sheer volume of what is being taught. therefore, more guidelines should be given on what to study, what is important, and an overview should be given so that the details do not distract from what is truly important. other than that, lecturers are friendly and easy to approach. 

Anonymous

Medicine at UCL is a highly demanding but vastly interesting course. We have a 4 week introductory module that serves as a great transition from A level but the high number of contact hours is something you will have to adapt to. Mini formative assessments online and written ones are really useful in exposing gaping voids in your knowledge! There is a fabulous mixture of teaching styles, the lectures are recorded online too - we get to do tutorials and workshops that reinforce the practical sides of Medicine and work through clinical cases. Every Thursday, we work of Clinical and Professional practice which is has involved meeting patients, visiting GP's, seeing the ethical and legal parts of medicine to understand. I'm really enjoying my time here as the people are all willing to help and the resources are frankly endless, it's kind of overwhelming. There is always room for improvement - I would love more small group work and fewer 9am lectures!

Anonymous

it has a good set of lecture notes and slides that have been modelled on feedback from medical students for the past decade or so. Professors always answer questions via email within 24 hours.

Anonymous

I have completed three modules of my degree so far. The module Infection and Defence was really well structured; lectures were always accompanied with key notes which was helpful to read through beforehand. There were some tutorials which were less useful but a good chance to discuss topics that I didn't understand fully. The supportive CALs and workshops in the labs were helpful for consolidating the lectures and made sure you understood the content to the level required in the final exams. We had a formative (mock test) at the beginning of December which was a good way of assessing how much work you were doing and indicated how much more you needed to do, although obviously they are only indicators and your grade shouldn't be taken too much to heart. The next formative is in February following the Circulation and Breathing module. C&B is taught along side the first anatomy sessions and the lectures closely match the anatomy lab sessions we have which is very useful. Anatomy is great as you get to see what it is you're being taught and helps you gain a fuller understanding. It can be a lot being in the lab for 3 hours at a time as it can get hot and smelly, so I usually take a breather outside half way through. So far, I've loved studying here, the lectures are interesting and normally recorded so you can go back over anything you don't get first time around. The lecturers at very supportive and happy to receive lots of emails with questions.

Anonymous

I have completed three modules of my degree so far. I felt the first module was slightly repetitive and slow as much of it was A level content with some slightly new material, but essentially it was repeating topics to get everyone to the same basic level. The next module Infection and Defence was really well structured; lectures were always accompanied with key notes which was helpful to read through beforehand. There were some tutorials which were less useful but a good chance to discuss topics that I didn't understand fully. The supportive CALs and workshops in the labs were helpful for consolidating the lectures and made sure you understood the content to the level required in the final exams. We had a formative (mock test) at the beginning of December which was a good way of assessing how much work you were doing and indicated how much more you needed to do, although obviously they are only indicators and your grade shouldn't be taken too much to heart. The next formative is in February following the Circulation and Breathing module. C&B is taught along side the first anatomy sessions and the lectures closely match the anatomy lab sessions we have which is very useful. Anatomy is great as you get to see what it is you're being taught and helps you gain a fuller understanding. It can be a lot being in the lab for 3 hours at a time as it can get hot and smelly, so I usually take a breather outside half way through. So far, I've loved studying here, the lectures are interesting and normally recorded so you can go back over anything you don't get first time around. The lecturers at very supportive and happy to receive lots of emails with questions.