MBBS Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor
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Reviews

Anonymous

This course is very demanding, but as you remain in the same cohort of around 350 students for the 6 years you feel supported and thebqork load doesn't feel overwhelming. The medical school has a strong sense of identity, and competitions between other medical schools in central London allow you to meet new people all the time. The course is lead by some of the countries leading doctors, and access to specialist hospitals such as Great Ormond Street and The National Neurology Hospital in Queens Square give provide unique and unparalleled experiences.

Anonymous

I study medicine at UCL and am currently in my third year. The past three years have gone by very quickly and much has been covered in that time. UCL Medical school opts for a ‘traditional’ system of teaching similar to that of Oxford and Cambridge, where the first two ‘preclinical’ years are dedicated to understanding the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the body that will then be built on from clinical years 4-6. From what I experienced over the past two years, it is a jump from A-levels, but not necessarily in terms of hardness of the content, but simply on the workload. Both preclinical years, mock tests are set at the end of term 1 and 2 to gauge progress, but all exams (4 in total) are sat over 3 days in the middle of May. This is stressful, and there is a lot to cram for during Easter revision. An additional difficulty is the lack of past paper practice which you are used to from A-levels, so finding alternative ways of testing yourself on facts is essential. A strong positive culture in the Medical school however is the student support – there are always older years happy to help in terms of advice and notes. I am currently in my third year, which is the bridge year between the pre-clin and clinical years, and is a year having the opportunity to do research in a variety of deparments. I feel that that ability to do this is one of UCL’s strong points – it provides the opportunity for a Bsc along with your MBBS degree, and also allows you to immerse yourself into key research taking place – I for example am doing Neuroscience and have thoroughly enjoyed this year. Overall, I am satisfied with the uni and am looking forward to the three more years ahead.

Anonymous

The course is generally pretty good - it is organised into systems of the body, so in first year it is normal foundations (A-level knowledge), then infections and disease, then circulation and breathing (i.e. lungs and heart), then fluids, nutrition and metabolism. While the course itself is not too complex, you need to make sure that you really understand concepts, especially things like preload and afterload in C&B, in order to get the best marks. CIF weeks are useful and should be revised for, even though they are just mocks. I'm enjoying the course but feedback isn't great, hence why you should use CIF weeks as a marker. Also, lecture cast is poor quality but useful, but don't do it for every lecture - only do the ones that you either missed or did not understand the first time, otherwise it will take too much time.

Anonymous

Course is very informative and useful, giving us a broad variety of different topics. There is great student support not just by members of staff but also by other older students who are also taking the course.

Anonymous

The structure of the course is as follows: 2 years pre-clinical (primarily lecture based teaching), 1 year compulsory BSc (approximately 16 choices), 3 years clinical (there are three teaching associated teaching hospitals: UCH, Royal Free, Whittington).The primary form of assessment during years 1-2 are Single Best Answer papers, conducted at the end of the year. Each paper is 2 hours long and covers all the material taught during lectures. Additionally, there is an anatomy spot test composed of 50 questions.There is a good balance to the course and the material is very interesting.

Anonymous

The medical degree at UCL is academically focused with an engaging teaching programme but also with opportunities to meet patients in the preclinical years and to reflect on your experiences. The integrated BSc is compulsory meaning there is a very wide range of subjects to choose from in your 3rd year and a way to do some independent scientific research and inform your future career.

Anonymous

Although the course is challenging so far, the lecturers are good and provide detailed handouts to accompany the lectures. The anatomy sessions are extremely useful but you need to read up before hand to make the most of the sessions. I recommend getting another anatomy textbook in addition to the required Dean and Peggington books for UCL.

Anonymous

I am currently in my iBSc year. I elected Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering. It is a well structured course which assimilates the medical students well. There is a Maths module solely for the intercalating students which acts to catch us up on the Maths and Physics concepts needed to fully grasp the other modules.The other modules are mostly imaging and treatment oriented. There is a lot of Physics content but also clinical aspects which are interesting and useful for the medical students. The coursework is given with enough time for completion and really helps consolidate information given in lectures. All the exams are in the third term.Overall there is a lot of support from the iBSc tutor. There is a tutorial once a week where any issues with the course, timetabling, the module contents and any other issues can be discussed. I truly enjoyed the year. And I think that it is a good choice for medics not only looking to go into radiology or surgery but any student who wants to have a better understanding of the underlying principles of medical equipment and instruments and how to interpret artefacts and adaptations for best practice.

Anonymous

The course is fairly traditional, in that there is a clear pre-clinical / clinical divide after 3rd year, with mostly lectures before and most placements coming after 3rd year. In my opinion this is sensible as by the time you start clinical placements you should have covered most of the theory, whereas clinical experience early on in an integrated course may not be as useful if you haven't learnt enough theory.Content is delivered in a systems-based format which is good. Preclinical exams are mostly in SBA (single best answer) format, with some OSCEs (practical exams).

Anonymous

The ucl medical is very good, there are a lot of us (340 students) so it is usually very organised.We often have lectures followed by practicals followed by tutorials which help to consolidate what we've learnt. However, the most important thing with medicine is being self motivated to work yourself.

Anonymous

Having completed my first year of medicine i am left with a positive feeling about the course. Although initially it was hard to get used to the step up in the difficulty and increased work load of the course, i adjusted over the course of the year. The teaching is generally good, however there is not as much small tutorials as i would like.We have regular mock exams throughout the year which can be used as a good indication of how you are performing and which areas you need to improve upon. However the lack of exam papers can make it hard to revise in the summer and get enough practice at the style of question.Generally the students at staff are all very friendly at the university and there is a very positive atmosphere. The course is generally interesting, however there are some poorly taught modules which require a greater amount of self learning.The hardest thing about the course is the vast amount of content that needs to be covered and learnt in a great level of detail.

Anonymous

It's a 6 year degree. The first 2 years are pre clinical so mostly consist of lectures although there are a few clinical experiences interspersed throughout. The second year academically is quite tough with a lot of lectures. The third year, you don't study medicine but study an iBsc for which there are a lot of different options. The fourth fifth and sixth years are clinical which you spend mostly in the hospital where you are taught there. There are few lectures then and most of the teaching is done by doctors

Anonymous

Medicine is one of the most interesting degrees to study. Being able to study the human body is a privilege and the complexity of the human body never fails to surprise you. As one may expect it is a difficult course, but as with anything if you have a passion for the subject that should not put you off . At UCL the course is traditional (so not much clinical contact in the 1st 2-3 years) and we study the body by system (i.e. cardiovascular then neuro etc). The teaching is good, we are taught by experts in the field. Of course you get the occasional lecturer who would rather not be there but overall you cannot complain. We are assessed by SBAs (single best answer) and data interpretation, all at the end of the year. Overall I am enjoying the degree, but if you are considering medicine I would say you must be 100% certain and committed or you may struggle.

Anonymous

I enjoy studying Medicine at UCL because I really enjoy the london location and it does have a campus feel most other london universities don't. I feel the medical course is quite badly organised. There should definitely be more tutorials to consolidate fundamental learning points of the module and the personal tutor system is pointless because they don't know much about the degree so they can't offer any guidance. There could also be more relation to the science we're learning to a clinical setting - they have the occasional more integrative lectures but most of the time it's hard to relate some of the science to how it'll actually be used. The anatomy teaching in the labs is good and I enjoy dissection with cadavers. Currently I am only second year so it should be more exciting once I'm in clinical years.

Anonymous

I have really enjoyed my time at UCL (I have been there for the 3 clinical years after transferring from Cambridge, where I did the pre-clinical part of the medicine course). I have been based at 4 different hospitals and had exposure to a wide range of medical and surgical specialties, from the more common ones like A&E or cardiology to paediatrics and a student-selected component in global health. The teaching is generally good - a lot of it is on the wards or in the hospital you're based at. Sometimes learning clinical medicine is frustrating because you do spend a lot of time feeling not very useful or because doctors forget they were scheduled for bedside teaching with students, but book learning can't really make up for time of the wards so there's not much way around it (and my impression is that this is common to most med schools rather than being particularly about UCL). Another thing to be aware of is that the years at UCL medical school are very big (particularly in the clinical years) which can make it harder to get to know people as you're often with different people for different placements. But that tends not to matter too much and it's been a great experience overall.

Anonymous

The course is structured in such a way that we mostly use lectures, which is supplemented by practical classes, tutorials and sometimes computer aided sessions to help learn. We also learn anatomy, beginning in second term. It is useful in a way that allows you to structure your learning, and know what you should learn, but unfortunately the workload can be quite hard and you can often fall behind - it's important to study effectively to do well. Feedback is not as good, though we have mocks in November and February which are very useful. Finally the clinical part of the course is good - once a week we have a session dedicated to this which can help make medicine seem more relatable to what you learn.

Anonymous

There are two main components to the course: 1) the general science background and medical knowledge and 2) the broader aspects of knowledge you need to be a doctor, such as professionalism, ethics, knowledge of certain law, safeguarding, reasoning skills, assessing evidence (e.g. journals). UCL does very well in the league tables and is generally considered to be a very academic university. I've found it to be a very challenging course (I'm studying as a graduate so have done a previous degree) but I think as hard as it is now, it is preparing me well to be a good doctor. I've heard that people tend to like employing UCL doctors as they're very rounded because the course is not just purely focused on the academic side - there's a lot of developing communication and professional skills too.

Anonymous

A good variety of traditional and PBL teaching, as well as some patient exposure from Year 1. There is excellent support from older students and this is facilitated by clubs and societies. Teaching is variable as with any course, but core lecturers are usually very good.

Anonymous

The course is 6 years long with the first two years being heavily lecture based. The third year is where you do an intercalated bsc, where you will be able to develop further insight into a particular topic, such as global health. Years 4-6 are your clinical years, where you will be situated at a hospital and gain experience of what it will actually be like to be a doctor.

Anonymous

Organised, full of content and (enjoyable). could have more assitance and guidance by giving us more notes. it is quite complex based on the sheer volume of what is being taught. therefore, more guidelines should be given on what to study, what is important, and an overview should be given so that the details do not distract from what is truly important. other than that, lecturers are friendly and easy to approach. 

Anonymous

I have completed three modules of my degree so far. The module Infection and Defence was really well structured; lectures were always accompanied with key notes which was helpful to read through beforehand. There were some tutorials which were less useful but a good chance to discuss topics that I didn't understand fully. The supportive CALs and workshops in the labs were helpful for consolidating the lectures and made sure you understood the content to the level required in the final exams. We had a formative (mock test) at the beginning of December which was a good way of assessing how much work you were doing and indicated how much more you needed to do, although obviously they are only indicators and your grade shouldn't be taken too much to heart. The next formative is in February following the Circulation and Breathing module. C&B is taught along side the first anatomy sessions and the lectures closely match the anatomy lab sessions we have which is very useful. Anatomy is great as you get to see what it is you're being taught and helps you gain a fuller understanding. It can be a lot being in the lab for 3 hours at a time as it can get hot and smelly, so I usually take a breather outside half way through. So far, I've loved studying here, the lectures are interesting and normally recorded so you can go back over anything you don't get first time around. The lecturers at very supportive and happy to receive lots of emails with questions.

Anonymous

I have completed three modules of my degree so far. I felt the first module was slightly repetitive and slow as much of it was A level content with some slightly new material, but essentially it was repeating topics to get everyone to the same basic level. The next module Infection and Defence was really well structured; lectures were always accompanied with key notes which was helpful to read through beforehand. There were some tutorials which were less useful but a good chance to discuss topics that I didn't understand fully. The supportive CALs and workshops in the labs were helpful for consolidating the lectures and made sure you understood the content to the level required in the final exams. We had a formative (mock test) at the beginning of December which was a good way of assessing how much work you were doing and indicated how much more you needed to do, although obviously they are only indicators and your grade shouldn't be taken too much to heart. The next formative is in February following the Circulation and Breathing module. C&B is taught along side the first anatomy sessions and the lectures closely match the anatomy lab sessions we have which is very useful. Anatomy is great as you get to see what it is you're being taught and helps you gain a fuller understanding. It can be a lot being in the lab for 3 hours at a time as it can get hot and smelly, so I usually take a breather outside half way through. So far, I've loved studying here, the lectures are interesting and normally recorded so you can go back over anything you don't get first time around. The lecturers at very supportive and happy to receive lots of emails with questions.

Anonymous

The teaching is excellent and clear. However, lectures are of a very large number so it is quite impersonal and asking questions to lecturers is difficult. There is a lot of support from peers to make up for this.

Anonymous

I transferred to UCL from Cambridge University after completing 3 years of pre-clinical studies and I am very happy I made the decision. Cambridge provides a lovely, small community within the colleges and while I miss the intimacy of college life, UCL is very good at throwing people together in small teaching groups so I still have an immediate group of friends despite the huge year group. There is a good social scene, especially Wednesday night if you play sports and facilities such as student bars and libraries are excellent. The final three years of medicine involve rotating through lots of hospitals and I think this is a very good thing as you see a wide range of medical conditions and get used to mucking into a team of people you don't know.

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