MBBS Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

This course is very demanding, but as you remain in the same cohort of around 350 students for the 6 years you feel supported and thebqork load doesn't feel overwhelming. The medical school has a strong sense of identity, and competitions between other medical schools in central London allow you to meet new people all the time. The course is lead by some of the countries leading doctors, and access to specialist hospitals such as Great Ormond Street and The National Neurology Hospital in Queens Square give provide unique and unparalleled experiences.

Anonymous

It's a very good degree, with a good course structure and excellent learning environment. Teaching is efficient and thorough, can go to lecturers for additional help if I feel it's needed. They're open to answering any questions, and are very approachable. Content is very challenging, and stretches memory capability. Student support network is very good, although more students need to be aware it's available should they need it.

Anonymous

Although good university with a fair amount of first class teaching, the organisation and admin is below the standard youd expect from one of the best universities.

Anonymous

I study medicine at UCL and am currently in my third year. The past three years have gone by very quickly and much has been covered in that time. UCL Medical school opts for a ‘traditional’ system of teaching similar to that of Oxford and Cambridge, where the first two ‘preclinical’ years are dedicated to understanding the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the body that will then be built on from clinical years 4-6. From what I experienced over the past two years, it is a jump from A-levels, but not necessarily in terms of hardness of the content, but simply on the workload. Both preclinical years, mock tests are set at the end of term 1 and 2 to gauge progress, but all exams (4 in total) are sat over 3 days in the middle of May. This is stressful, and there is a lot to cram for during Easter revision. An additional difficulty is the lack of past paper practice which you are used to from A-levels, so finding alternative ways of testing yourself on facts is essential. A strong positive culture in the Medical school however is the student support – there are always older years happy to help in terms of advice and notes. I am currently in my third year, which is the bridge year between the pre-clin and clinical years, and is a year having the opportunity to do research in a variety of deparments. I feel that that ability to do this is one of UCL’s strong points – it provides the opportunity for a Bsc along with your MBBS degree, and also allows you to immerse yourself into key research taking place – I for example am doing Neuroscience and have thoroughly enjoyed this year. Overall, I am satisfied with the uni and am looking forward to the three more years ahead.

Anonymous

It is a fantastic course with such a variety to offer. The first two years were lecture based and preclinical without much focus on patients. Then we had the chance to do an integrated BSc in a speciality of our choice which gave me a great insight into Paediatrics. Now we do our clinical years where we get teaching in top hospitals in a wide range of specialities which is excellent.

Anonymous

The course is generally pretty good - it is organised into systems of the body, so in first year it is normal foundations (A-level knowledge), then infections and disease, then circulation and breathing (i.e. lungs and heart), then fluids, nutrition and metabolism. While the course itself is not too complex, you need to make sure that you really understand concepts, especially things like preload and afterload in C&B, in order to get the best marks. CIF weeks are useful and should be revised for, even though they are just mocks. I'm enjoying the course but feedback isn't great, hence why you should use CIF weeks as a marker. Also, lecture cast is poor quality but useful, but don't do it for every lecture - only do the ones that you either missed or did not understand the first time, otherwise it will take too much time.

Anonymous

Amazing university with fantastic career prospects. Have made friends for life. One of the best decisions I have made in terms of furthering my academic career. I know that I am well set for the future, and I know that everything bodes well ,with such a good foundation that I have here.

Anonymous

The medical course at UCL is great. It is very varied and includes a mixture of both scientific and social, ethical and practical teaching, all of which is necessary to become a good doctor. You are able to intercalate in 3rd year which allows you to develop good research skills. In the last three years you are able to gain good clinical practice by doing rotations in various hospitals.I have been able to gain experience in some of the UK's top hospital such as Great Ormond Street.The assessments are quite challenging as they all come down to several exams at the end of the year, however as it is a lecture based learning course, it is straight forward as to what you need to know.Overall I would highly recommend the course.

Anonymous

The quality of the degree is unparalleled. The course is well organised and well taught. Students also have the pleasure of tutorials to allow them to grasp specific aspects of the course that they do not understand. The opportunity to perform full body dissections is also a great way to learn anatomy. The student life is brilliant with a whole student body RUMS dedicated to the well being of students which is always welcome.

Anonymous

Course is very informative and useful, giving us a broad variety of different topics. There is great student support not just by members of staff but also by other older students who are also taking the course.

Anonymous

It's a very extensive course covering all the important and necessary parts of what is needed to be a doctor, and more. It is in the frist years heavily scientifically based which in my opinion is a merit. It also allows you to balance social and academic life well and prepares you well to become a doctor.

Anonymous

The structure of the course is as follows: 2 years pre-clinical (primarily lecture based teaching), 1 year compulsory BSc (approximately 16 choices), 3 years clinical (there are three teaching associated teaching hospitals: UCH, Royal Free, Whittington).The primary form of assessment during years 1-2 are Single Best Answer papers, conducted at the end of the year. Each paper is 2 hours long and covers all the material taught during lectures. Additionally, there is an anatomy spot test composed of 50 questions.There is a good balance to the course and the material is very interesting.

Anonymous

UCL Medical School is a great place to learn medicine, and has a great record of producing excellent clinicians. The student support offered to the students is poor at best and the organisation/information given to students is minimal and poorly distributed. It is so well known throughout the medical school, that older year warn us about it in freshers week. I cannot think how they can change this, it is a large student body, but more transparency would be greatly appreciated.

Anonymous

The medical degree at UCL is academically focused with an engaging teaching programme but also with opportunities to meet patients in the preclinical years and to reflect on your experiences. The integrated BSc is compulsory meaning there is a very wide range of subjects to choose from in your 3rd year and a way to do some independent scientific research and inform your future career.

Anonymous

Although the course is challenging so far, the lecturers are good and provide detailed handouts to accompany the lectures. The anatomy sessions are extremely useful but you need to read up before hand to make the most of the sessions. I recommend getting another anatomy textbook in addition to the required Dean and Peggington books for UCL.

Anonymous

I am currently in my iBSc year. I elected Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering. It is a well structured course which assimilates the medical students well. There is a Maths module solely for the intercalating students which acts to catch us up on the Maths and Physics concepts needed to fully grasp the other modules.The other modules are mostly imaging and treatment oriented. There is a lot of Physics content but also clinical aspects which are interesting and useful for the medical students. The coursework is given with enough time for completion and really helps consolidate information given in lectures. All the exams are in the third term.Overall there is a lot of support from the iBSc tutor. There is a tutorial once a week where any issues with the course, timetabling, the module contents and any other issues can be discussed. I truly enjoyed the year. And I think that it is a good choice for medics not only looking to go into radiology or surgery but any student who wants to have a better understanding of the underlying principles of medical equipment and instruments and how to interpret artefacts and adaptations for best practice.

Anonymous

The course is fairly traditional, in that there is a clear pre-clinical / clinical divide after 3rd year, with mostly lectures before and most placements coming after 3rd year. In my opinion this is sensible as by the time you start clinical placements you should have covered most of the theory, whereas clinical experience early on in an integrated course may not be as useful if you haven't learnt enough theory.Content is delivered in a systems-based format which is good. Preclinical exams are mostly in SBA (single best answer) format, with some OSCEs (practical exams).

Anonymous

The ucl medical is very good, there are a lot of us (340 students) so it is usually very organised.We often have lectures followed by practicals followed by tutorials which help to consolidate what we've learnt. However, the most important thing with medicine is being self motivated to work yourself.

Anonymous

I really enjoy all aspects of my degree. It is a more traditional style medical course, with preclinical lectures dominating the timetable for the first two years while patient contact is interspersed throughout. As someone who likes to learn theoretically before applying practically, I really appreciated this style of course. The interspersed patient contact is just enough to remind us we'll eventually be doctors - keeping us interested while the focus is still on lectures. The intercalated BSc degree in third year is a great opportunity to move in a slightly different direction and frees up the schedule which is a great opportunity to do other things at university. The final three years are all spent in hospital, on wards, dealing with patients every day. It's the best part of the course - very hands on, practical and fast-paced and with the true end goal in sight

Anonymous

Having completed my first year of medicine i am left with a positive feeling about the course. Although initially it was hard to get used to the step up in the difficulty and increased work load of the course, i adjusted over the course of the year. The teaching is generally good, however there is not as much small tutorials as i would like.We have regular mock exams throughout the year which can be used as a good indication of how you are performing and which areas you need to improve upon. However the lack of exam papers can make it hard to revise in the summer and get enough practice at the style of question.Generally the students at staff are all very friendly at the university and there is a very positive atmosphere. The course is generally interesting, however there are some poorly taught modules which require a greater amount of self learning.The hardest thing about the course is the vast amount of content that needs to be covered and learnt in a great level of detail.

Anonymous

I spent three years at Cambridge University and moved to UCL for Clinical Medicine. The hospitals that you get placed are are fantastic, and have some of the best departments across Europe in various fields. Great teaching and great people, and you're in London! Would thoroughly recommend it to anyone. It's been a lot of fun so far, and really interesting too!

Anonymous

It's medicine. Wherever you go, you know it's not going to be easy. UCL is no exception, but with some of the highest contact hours of any medicine course in the country, the opportunity for you to seek help from academics and ask as many questions as you please means that there's less for you to just 'get on with and figure out'. If you're stuck on a concept, you WILL be able to ask someone to explain it to you. An integrated curriculum taught on a systems based basis means that you learn how everything fits together to make a particular organ system work, as opposed to studying topics like anatomy or physiology in blocks, where linking them together may not make sense. Assessment is in the form of Single Best Answer papers, a Data Interpretation paper and an Anatomy Spot Test for the first year.

Anonymous

I really enjoy my degree. It is so interesting. The course is six years, six years of fun and constant. Learning. We have a lot of lectures which I really enjoy. Our tutorials are rare and large which is just what you look for. This year we had two formative assessments one in December and one in February and then the summatives in May which occurred over the three days.

Anonymous

My medical degree here in UCL has been nothing short of amazing. The early exposure I get to the clinical settings and getting the chance to speak to patients has been an eye-opening experience and I am grateful for the chance to continuously be involved in the more practical side of medicine in my pre-clinical years. Lecturers are great and the lectures themselves have been ok. Friendly staff and good facilities are provided. Well-supported so far, and I like how they take feedback from students very seriously, always looking for chances to improve the way the course can be taught.

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