MBBS (Hons) Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

I would say Medicine is one of the most rewarding degree offered at university. At Queen Mary, Medicine consists of a 5 year degree where the first 2 years is lecture based, and the following 3 years are more clinical, where you spend more time in hospital and in General Practices. I believe Medicine achieves a great balance of scientific knowledge and social improvements and I have thoroughly enjoyed my four years so far.

Anonymous

Medicine itself is a fascinating course to study. I am constantly challenged and engaged, whilst being encouraged to independently enrich my knowledge. At Bart's and the London medical school, we are taught through a variety of mediums; from small group sessions (PBL) to lectures, and clinical skills practice to body system dissection. This hybrid system of teaching enables all students to find the most efficient for them, and also exposes us to many different areas of medicine.

Anonymous

While a demanding degree, there is no comparison to the enjoyment and satisfaction one can obtain from this degree. Well structured, excellent support, and quality teaching all help make the degree what it is!

Anonymous

Being a doctor is a rewarding career and the choice of medical school is where it initially all starts! Medicine at Barts and then London is great for many reasons. The course structure is well set out so you have a good balance of clinical exposure through biweekly GP placements, lectures (around 9/10 a week), anatomy, physiology and histology sessions and the chance to dissect for two weeks at some during the year.We also have problem based learning (PBLs) twice a week which is great practice for "real life" where you won't just get classic patients out of a text book! Its East London location means that later on when you have hospital placements, there is a wide range of pathologies available to aid your knowledge. London itself is also a great city with lots to do if not a little expensive!Assessment wise we have three ICAs (in course assessments) before finals which is great in terms of preparing you for end of year, although it does mean you're constantly busy and puts you in a cycle of recovering after an exam then revising for the next one!The course itself is difficult in the sense there's a lot to learn and take in, its very time consuming and first year does count! But luckily everyone at Barts are lovely and very supportive; from day one you are allocated "mummies and daddies" who start of the familial relationship by taking you and you to one of the many curry amenities near Whitechapel along with their brothers/sisters/grandparents - it really is a family affair and they pay for your meal or drink ;)Teaching wise you may prefer some lecturers over others but that's to be expected and usually the majority of the information you need can be found on the lecture slides.We also take our sports very seriously with "tables" on a Wednesday - drinking games and team bonding with your sports squuuaaaad at the Griff - our much loved union, and then the opportunity to dance the night away at the same Griff.You'll be in the Griff a lot.I had the opportunity to go to medical school in Manchester, Birmingham or Nottingham and don't regret my decision to study at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry!

Anonymous

Number of lectures each day and two PBL sessions a week means that we have just about enough time to keep up to date with the work, and are still stretched at the same time. Anatomy teaching is excellent also.

Anonymous

Barts is highly rated as one of the best medical schools in London. It's the highest rated school that employs PBL if I'm not mistaken, which is a great way to not only break the tedium of lectures, but also get you to internalise content and express it in a digestible way, which helps your own learning immeasurably. In addition the system also helps you learn from fellow students' take on things, which can be really useful!Barts is also known for the quality of their clinical skills teaching - there's a strong emphasis on patient contact, we see patients at least fortnightly from the beginning of first year, such that before you enter clinical years you're already quite comfortable with speaking to patients.Barts is also home to world-renowned research institutions such as the Barts Cancer Institute, and our lectures are filled with info about the latest developments in research, many of which the lecturers themselves are working on! It's really interesting and makes you feel really privileged that you have these people speaking to you and teaching you the basics of their craft.

Anonymous

The course provides a good mixture of clinical and academic medicine. The presence of clinical placements from year 1 makes the course stand out above others. It places a great emphasis on communication skills and patient interactions from very early on, which is incredibly valuable. Hospital placements do vary in their efficacy however, but most are more than satisfactory.Placing exams after holidays (particuarly when we only get 2 weeks for christmas and easter) has left a lot of students feeling unsatisfied and has led to a few students dropping out, and overall tiredness / dissatisfaction rate being very high!

Anonymous

The degree is very interesting with a several unique concepts, however the teaching methods used, and the amount of workload and stress that accompanies it has made me want to quit several times.

Anonymous

The teaching at Queen Mary is incredible. The course is structured in a brilliant way. PBLs allow us to apply basic sciences into clinical practice in our first two years. The clinical years see us attached to some of the worlds leading hospitals - you see things one would never see anywhere else! Student life is amazing too, everyone is friendly and you are encouraged to get on board with a social activity!

Anonymous

The teaching at Queen Mary is incredible. The course is structured in a brilliant way. PBLs allow us to apply basic sciences into clinical practice in our first two years. The clinical years see us attached to some of the worlds leading hospitals - you see things one would never see anywhere else! Student life is amazing too, everyone is friendly and you are encouraged to get on board with a social activity!

Anonymous

This is a challenging but rewarding course. Although you do have clinical situations where you have regular gp placements and then the possibility of a 2 week hospital placement from first year, the first two years are spent teaching preclinical material. You can then go on to gain clinical experience in 3rd, 4th and 5th year. The course consists of lectures, PBLs, practicals and placements. It is intense, however you tend to find a balance between the difficulties of work and having a social life. You can join a wide range of sports and society's who offer regular trainings and socials. You have to put in a lot of effort, but to me it's worth it.

Anonymous

Most lecturers and tutors are very helpful and provide wide range of support to all the students. Social life in Bart's and the London school of medicine of queen Mary is also full of surprises and fun.

Anonymous

At Barts, a mixture of both the traditional style of lectures and PBL (Problem-Based Learning) is used to teach the materials to students. This has benefited many students including myself, as it gives the opportunity for us to learn the core materials during lectures and apply them during PBLs, and also allows us to improve our problem-solving skills.

Anonymous

Brilliant medical course with a mixture of lecture taught material and practical skills. Teaching is provided by the best in their field and is interesting, interactive and current. This is combined with practical anatomy sessions and dissection which provides an all round perception of medicine. In addition to this the placements provide an insight into the day to day life of a doctor and provide you with outstanding clinical experience across a range of London based hospitals and Waltham centres. Assessment is based on clinical skills, knowledge and practical and communication skills and supper and regular feedback is provided throughout the course. Although a small university the medical school has a great deal to offer both academically and socially. I would recommend to anyone wishing to persue a career in medicine.

Anonymous

The programme is specifically designed for graduates. Unlike other graduate programmes that tell you to attend as many first and second year lectures possible, Bart's provides you with a tailor made timetable. This ensures the right content is covered in enough detail for you as a graduate. The cohort is a nice size with 40 people which ensures that each individual is recognised and support particularly through the year which inevitably challenging due it being years one and two condensed into one.Teaching includes lectures, practicals and anatomy ensuring a well rounded understanding of all topics. Bart's also provides early patient contact which involves weekly contact with patient either at a general practice or at hospital. This is great for developing communication skills and application of knowledge.After every couple of modules, understanding is assessed with internal course assessments. Although preparation for these can be stressful, they are useful to monitor your own progression.Overall, I have really this course so far and would definitely recommend Bart's to anyone considering applying there.

Anonymous

An excellent degree choice. Hard work, but highly rewarding in the long term. Challenging, but mentally stimulating. An excellent choice who have a passion for people and for problem solving. A well structured course with relevant information given at relevant with the right levels of complexity at each point, and increasingly more complex as the course progresses. The teaching is excellent with a variety of lectures, practicals and clinical exposure. Assessments are at regular intervals through the year, which although producing added pressure, also helps from the point of view that finals become less stressful.

Anonymous

The course at Barts medical and dental school is brilliant. As a medical student they expose is to clinical placements early on so that you can truly see what being a doctor is about. This included some hospital and some GP placements, meaning you get good interactions with patients at the level of both primary and secondary care. Also there is such a community feel here as the older years really take responsibility for helping out their younger peers. The societies and clubs at Barts are really brilliant and friendly and truly are what makes Barts such a great community. The lectures are engaging and interesting, with a good emphasis on the clinical relevance. The staff are really helpful and approachable and there are clear places to go should you need help. I am so glad I came to study here, particularly as it is so close to central London there is loads to do, but also not so close that prices are too ridiculous (though it is still more expensive than other student cities)

Anonymous

Excellent degree. 100% worthwhile doing. Massive satisfaction from it, with huge scope to develop one's self. Obviously hard work, but for anyone who's not afraid of some hard work, it's definitely worth while, with the potential to problem solve and apply all knowledge gained throughout the whole degree

Anonymous

I really enjoy studying medicine at Barts. The course structure is really good as you will constantly cover topics and build your knowledge over the years so you're less likely to forget things. Having clinical exposure from year 1 is great as it gets you oht meeting real patients and not just staying in lectures all day.The exams, you have one roughly every 9 weeks and then finals at the end of the year which cover everything studied that year. It sounds intense but if you put effort in and don't leave things last minute it works quite well.Lots of societies to get involved with whether it's sports or science relayed or music and dance so enjoy yourself! And enjoy living in London too!

Anonymous

The degree is hard, as all medical degrees are, and constantly examined. however, there is a good blend of lectures, problem based learning and practical learning during the first 2 years followed by good clinical placements from year 3 onwards. The social side of the university is very good and the extracurricular opportunities are vast and easy to access. The biggest problem is the increasing lack of autonomy the medical school (barts and the london) has from Queen Mary. basically anything negative is always due to interference from Queen mary.

Anonymous

The degree itself is very enjoyable, the course layout is good and the constant exams make sure no one is left slacking. However at times it can be quite intense and the lack of breaks after exams can be demoralizing. However since it is medicine I had expected this and therefore I revel in the challenge

Anonymous

The structure is good. There is a combination of learning content a clinical placements. It's a fantastic course and you know that you'll be able to help a lot of people with the skills you learn

Anonymous

The course complexity is pitched perfectly, I think. Whether your science knowledge is already amazing or you were always a bit naff at it, the lecturers are all very good at ensuring the content is inclusive and accessible to all, while still being challenging for the better students. The structure is fully integrated with clinical teaching on placements, which is a real boon as otherwise I'd be in hospitals with no idea at all what I was doing! Some of the lecturers are particularly brilliant, and here at Bart's we have many world leading specialists. All-in-all it's an amazing course Queen Mary offer!

Anonymous

One of the things I really like about the way in which our Medicine course at Bart’s and the London is structured is the integration of clinical medicine right from the beginning, in year 1. It allows us to have a context-based approach when we’re learning the pre-clinical sciences and also makes what we’re learning feel purposeful. We have PBLs twice a week after first year – these sessions allow us to explore the topic into greater depth with a tutor in small groups whilst learning from each other, which I think can be really useful especially if you have some holes in your knowledge that you were not aware of.

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