MBBS (Hons) Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

Medicine at King's is good. There are lots of facilities at your disposal, though they are not promoted/advertised that well so you do have to look at the elder year for guidance. The university has lots to offer academically and socially with loads of events being held all year round. There is a lot of support available for those who require it and many "timeout activities" during exam times for students to relax

Anonymous

The teaching is the first two years is entirely lecture based and of very variable quality - they are currently restructuring the curriculum so this may change. Pastoral care is fairly non-existent and is essentially a box ticking exercise - the low student satisfaction surveys are a reflection of this. Teaching in clinical years is much better, although almost entirely down to your firm head so the coverage/content, timetable and quality is again very variable. In general, I have found the clinicians to be welcoming and to give good quality teaching when time pressure allows. 4/5 stars because I love the degree and if you can stick it out through the poor first two years it gets a lot better!

Anonymous

Medicine is an incredible degree to study. Kings approach the course in a semi-traditional fashion whereby they have 2 years of pre-clinical lecture based learning with integrated clinical skills and patient interaction followed by 3 years of placements where you are fully immersed in hospitals and general practice. They have a reputation for throwing you in at the deep end but most students find this a really useful way to learn and helps you take control of your own learning. I couldn't imagine studying anything else. It's incredibly rewarding both for the intellectual challenge and the impact and benefit you can have for patients from the very first day on the wards.Kings are the largest medical school in Europe and as such the admin team do struggle at times. It can be strange having 450 in your year and not knowing half of them even by year 6. You do have smaller teaching sessions and they are changing things to try and enable you to have some continuity with peers but more work is needed. Overall it's great!

Anonymous

The placements are extremely useful and I appreciate the structure in which it's set. It would have been nice to have more clinical experience in the first two years before we entered into clinical practice. Teaching equally would be better if there was more small group teaching as opposed to lectures but this is dependent on the size of the year. I appreciate that it is difficult for small group teaching to occur considering that the year size is so big.

Anonymous

Very good university with some of the best hospitals in the world. The campus is beautiful and is in the heart of London. Teaching is fantastic as you're taught by some world-renowned doctors. Unfortunately, with the introduction of the new medical curriculum at King's College, the organisation of the clinical years is a bit messy. Students are sent to hospitals all over the place, including Maidstone, Canterbury and Dartford.

Anonymous

The subject is great but the support is not. There are too many administrative issues with KCL: poor communication, misinformation, conflicting information, releasing incorrect exam papers, leaking exam questions etc. There is very minimal support and guidance around exams, and poor excuses for these. However the clinical placements are good due to the area. There's a mix of poverty and wealth within the hospitals kings works with, and this gives an extremely broad experience of medicine.

Anonymous

This is a really good course but can be quite stressful sometimes!! The king's lecturers are really good and they record all of the lectures which is handy when you fancy a lie in!! The only thing to consider if you're interested in studying medicine is how full on the course is and if you really want to be a doctor

Anonymous

Medicine is a great degree which enables the student to prepare for a career in the medical world.Pre-clinics gives exposure to knowledge of systems of the body which will be needed, with the dissection sessions at KCL acting to materialise lecture content.Overall the teaching is good, and lecture capture is a brilliant tool for being able to review lecturers work.

Anonymous

Medicine teaching at king's is great. In the preclinical years each system is taught as a case study, allowing to learn each part in detail before moving on. The fact kings also have dissection allows great hands on experience observing the human body. One thing that is lacking in kings is feedback from teachers, sometimes its vague and other times there is no feedback.

Anonymous

I enjoy the fact the preclinical and clinical parts of the course are separate. However could be more patient contact in the first year. King's allow you to do a degree in a year so intercalate which has meant I could pursue interests in a specific subject. Assessment style is multiple choice questions which I personally struggle with due to them having more than one correct answer. However, there are also in course assessment which are more written style answers and the student selected components in which you do an essay. The lecturers are often involved in current research and are experts in their field.

Anonymous

Unfortunately the syllabus is being revamped, so the future of the Bachelors is a bit uncertain! So far I would rate the course as okay - the year groups are quite large, so the teaching is largely lecture based and you don't get too much attention - though some prefer this. The facilities though are great and the hospitals are highly specialist centres, where the quality of teaching is great.

Anonymous

I started studying medicine at KCL in 2012. At the time I joined there was very low student satisfaction and the course was very low in quality. Since then, there has been a lot of effort to work on student feedback, providing more support for students and improving the course. I think that the course has drastically improved in this time. It will always rely on at least some self motivation and being proactive as with 450 students in the year, there is more competition, however now it is not as easy to get lost in the crowd. The teaching quality has improved, and I believe that if I could choose again, I would choose King's for the great location, constantly improving course and the amazing research opportunities.

Anonymous

Five year course includes 2 years of lecture based studies and 3 of clinical placements. There is a huge amount of material to be learnt, which would be expected with the course, so the first two years are quite packed with lectures. Clinical placements are offered in a wide variety of hospitals, but experiences can vary widely. It is not always clear what material we need to cover and it can often feel like we've just been thrown into a hospital with little instruction. But, ultimately, I guess, it builds character?

Anonymous

Content is good, as is structure, but often the feedback isn't great, nor is the support system. It feels like you are a piece in a large puzzle, rather than a student at a uni

Anonymous

The volume of the work of medicine might seem quite overwhelming. At points it is easy to be overcome by the sheer volume of content that needs to be known, but it is important to remember that everyone is in the same boat. In medical school there is contact time heavy, meaning you may not have as much time as your colleagues doing other courses, but in all honesty, it is no different to a normal school day.

Anonymous

Medicine has been a highly enjoyable course so far. For the first two years we have been studying about the body itself and mechanisms that go on within however we have had only a few visits where we get to meet patients at a GP surgery/hospitals. When we do get to meet patients it is highly interesting and valuable as I am able to apply everything I've learnt over the past two years and start to construct some kind of diagnosis in my head. Furthermore talking to patients and trying to understand the situation from their perspective has been highly challenging but has taught me a lot about how important it is to not just concentrate on the illness alone but on the person as a whole. Teaching at Kings's is mainly via lectures, tutorials and seminars. Tutorials include of a small group of students discussing questions from a topic, we are currently studying, with a tutor who is knowledgable about that topic. The lectures are also recorded which is extremely useful as if I am unable to attend the lecture, I can always catch up as soon as possible especially because lecture recordings are put up as quickly as possible. Forms of assessment include of internal assessments throughout the year, written exams (MCQs) and, from year 2 onwards, OSCEs. Sufficient time is provided for revision however I found that this year all the internal assessments were less evenly distributed throughout the year and clustered closer to OSCEs which made it difficult to prepare for OSCEs. King's provides a lot of support with OSCEs and there are several clubs we can join in order to get help. Furthermore we have several opportunities throughout the year to practise our communication skills with simulated patients whereby we also receive useful and honest feedback from the actors themselves. Overall, I have really enjoyed studying Medicine at Kings and I look forward to continuing my studies.

Anonymous

The medicine course at kcl is fantastic. The introduction oc the ndw curriculum 2020, ensures thag students get greater amount of clinical hands on time than their older peers did. You learn, regarding the basic science all 1st year medics need to learn is put into a clinical context to make it come across as a relevant to the vocation of being a doctor. The lecturers are a bit hit and miss but on the whole provide good teaching. Finally all lectures are recored and put online which allows you to go back over the lecture in your own time.

Anonymous

Medicine is a very hard and challenging degree, requires a lot of sacrifice, hard work and dedication. But in the end is well worth it, there is a job waiting for you when you graduate and there is a lot of variety of career paths you can choose. The teaching at king college london could have been better as much of the work depends on independent learning.

Anonymous

King College London is a very good university, especially for medicine. It's location in London is really central, at Guy's Campus in London bridge. It has many clubs and societies for everyone, not only for medics but also whole KCl ones, also as it is a multi-faculty university there is opportunity to intercalate and do student selected components in a variety of subject not offered at many universities. King's unlike many other medical schools offers full body dissection which allows you not only allows you to visualise many organs but also to see them as part of a bigger picture in the whole human body. The hospitals affiliated with KCL are some of the best teaching hospitals in the country. Another advantage of studying in London is that you get the opportunity to see cases which are not seen around the country.

Anonymous

The degree was a 6 year degree with the first 3 years being campus based lectures and the final 3 years being clinical placements in hospitals. You begin the year learning the basics - biology, physiology anatomy, pharmacology etc and it can seem very overwhelming, but its important to start early. The second year for me was the most difficult in that it was very anatomy heavy and some clinical aspects were being leaked into teaching to help the transfer into year 3 which is clinical placements. OSCEs, the practicals, start in year 2 which I was very grateful for as it made it less daunting in year 3 when you actually have to start speaking to patients, taking bloods and blood pressure etc. It also gives a taste of what is to come. I felt the first 2 years are too lecture based and although we had some GP visits they weren't as helpful as if we had actually been in hospital placements, so it would be easy to forget why you got into medicine in the first place. The teaching depends on the lecturer; some are fantastic and you can tell they love the topic and love to teach; others are simply there because they have to be and its very mundane. Support s always available although if Im honest I dont use it. Clinical teachers are the same in that you will find some consultants love to teach but I found others were very rude and demeaning which affected my learning severely. I don't think forcing students to feel inadequate and embaressing them in front of the peers is acceptable; and it has already happened with 2 consultants. Assessment wise we have written exams and osces. Written exams ask a lot more specific questions than you'd expect and it helps to purchase online question banks and revision packs to help you through. Overall it is a difficult degree and a very long one, but it can be fun once you get into clinics and everything you learnt in those first years start to make sense as you see them in patients etc. The years do fly by very quickly and you don't realise how much you pick up simply by attending lectures and being around the hospital from nurses, phlebotomists, consultants as well.

Anonymous

The teaching at King's varies. For the most, the lectures are very informative, and the the lecture recording system is of very good quality, meaning access to relevant material can be done very quickly . Anatomy teaching is great, as we access to full body dissections, and the anatomy guides provided, make it very easy to learn. However practical skills are not taught enough, and I feel underprepared for OSCEs.

Anonymous

The teaching is really quite excellent, and the faculty is very experienced, drawing from a long tradition of teaching medicine. However, the administration of the college is truly dire and there is little support for students if they fall ill.

Anonymous

Teaching quality and facilities are great. Sometimes organisation of teaching is lacking leading to last min cancellation of teaching with no warning.Extra-Cirricular activities are Numerous abd setting up societies is fairly easy.

Anonymous

The King's medical degree is an exciting and varied programme with a logical structure. Although the first year has been a challenge due to the sheer volume of information to remember, there is a good support system to help students if they feel they can't cope. There are also dissection, practical and tutorial classes on top of lectures to help with learning, where students can ask questions directly to teachers and learn in more visual ways. The majority of lecturers are very accomplished and good at teaching (some are excellent) through lectures as well as tutorials and group sessions. However there are a few tutorial teachers who don't teach as a profession and really aren't the best teachers - they don't hide the fact that they'd rather not be there teaching you. This doesn't affect students too much though, as they will have many different teachers over the year so they won't be stuck with a bad one. There are also many feedback opportunities on every aspect of the course including teachers, which minimises bad teaching.The assessments are mainly at the end of the year, so are useful if you prefer a style where you get them all over with at the end rather than doing bits throughout the whole year. There are three multiple choice exams (a lot harder than many people think so don't believe this is an easy exam format) on the entire learning for the year. There are small assessments throughout the year such as a couple of essays, presentations and an exam paper in january. These are worth a small part of the grade, and you are required to pass.I really enjoyed my first year, as I think it's good to do a lot of academic work in the first two years in order to get into hospitals in the last three years. Although it was very academic we still had plenty of placements and practical sessions, which keep you orientated towards the end goal of becoming a doctor. The social life at kings is also amazing! We like to think we're not as serious as other top London universities (more partying, other interests as well as our subject) but we still achieve the same education and come out as well rounded (and not arrogant cough UCL cough) doctors.

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