LLB (Hons) Law

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

I feel like the content of the course was accessible and helpful, and had plenty of contact time with lecturers in order to clarify anything. The structure of the course follows the traditional path of Public, Contract, Criminal and EU Law in first year, however in second year I found that studying Trusts Law and Property Law in the same year is a bad idea due to the similarity and complementarity between them, and it would be better if they were studied in separate years. However, there were plenty of interesting optional modules which really made catered to every student's interest. Teaching was great for the better part of the course, with distinguished Professors sharing their knowledge with us. As expected from a top university, requirements were high and the assessments fairly difficult, however this only reflects the quality of the students who attend and the quality of teaching.

Anonymous

This course is considered a complex and difficult course as it requires a lot of hard work to read and research. Unlike other science based degree, all our assignment are essays based and thus it requires high level of language skills. The teachers are great in the sense of preparing teaching materials for the student and provide academic support. However, not every teaching method suits every student. Most of the time, students have to do their own research or read extra articles to understand more.

Anonymous

Nice structure to the degree in terms of modules and contact hours, and most of the teaching was very good, detailed and supportive. But some of the teaching wasn't very structured in terms of its content or the style of teaching - i.e. some things were taught in a way that wasn't simple to understand. Was also disappointed in the cancellation of certain elective modules.

Anonymous

- Structured very nicely, such that the second year's work follows a neat transition from the first year modules.- Lecturers are genuinely exceptional - always responding to our queries, along with our tutors too!- Being in London is simply unmatched as an experience of University in this country. Fully recommend

Anonymous

Law at King's is intensive yet fun. Most courses have elements of current affairs in them hence making tutorials debate worthy and stimulating. Although, at times, the feedback is somewhat slow, when it does come, it is usually very detailed and self explanatory. Tutors are willing to help students when they do not understand.

Anonymous

The qualify of teaching is inconsistent, especially across compulsory QLD modules. Some lecturers are extremely effective in conveying information and delivering material in an engaging way, while others leave much to be desired. The administration is satisfactorily sensitive to student feedback as well.

Anonymous

I think Law in Kings College London is amazing. It is undoubtedly one of the best Law schools in UK. The course is well structured, and the teachers always make it a point to provide sufficient guidance to students which is amazing. We have weekly seminars, one module per week, which is designed to challenge all that you have learnt. I have never learnt so much. The seminars are a 10 or less group where the professor prods you to heighten your understanding regarding a subject. I am truly happy in kings.

Anonymous

Studying law at KCL is very independent. The resource aren't great. They generally don't really care if you show up to class or not, and you can essentially get through the entire year without ever speaking to the academic faculty. That being said, there are some great professors around who are great intellectual resources if you go out of your way to communicate with them. Administration is horrible. Things like scheduling do not get done on time/properly.

Anonymous

The course, like any other LLB is rigorous enough. Students have access to a whole range of resources. I think the choices of modules could be more diverse.

Anonymous

Law is a challenging course, and although it will never be "easy", the way it is taught at kings is certainly helpful in tackling the degree. The Professors are experts, especially the lecturers, who's work we often find ourselves reading in the form of textbooks or academic articles. Also, the division of learning into lectures, tutorials, and seminars makes for a well rounded and coherent course. I definitely recommend Law at Kings.

Anonymous

Law is an intellectually rigorous degree. You have to be absolutely sure you are passionate about it or at least that you are willing to learn a lot as it requires a lot of reading and is very time-consuming. English law is useful because many Commonwealth countries have a similar system and many international organisations are using it as a prime example. However, if you are planning to practice after that, do not assume choosing a Law degree is the final step - it is not even a pre-requisite anymore so it is good if you have other reasons as well. Overall, although realistically, these have not been the best years in my life as it was very hard, I have no regrets - I have learned a lot, met some really intelligent and ambitious people and feel much more confident that I have the skill set for various types of jobs.

Anonymous

It is a very challenging subject wth a lot of reading and independent study time needed. Though it is very interesting and requires somebody who is very analytical and enjoys playing devils advocate. To do law, you need to be a critical thinker and sometimes think outside the box, you also need to take an interest in debates and philosophical ideas in regards to essay questions. Overall the university has a lot of good facilities to aid you in your work and a lot of good links with top law firms. The Maughan library is also a good hit with the law students and so is the lecture captures.

Anonymous

Law is a challenging yet rewarding subject, it pushes you to research areas of life that you would never think about. When I say push, I mean push as the conceptions of a law degree are completely true. But this is part of it's incredibly rewarding nature and anyone lucky enough to have any sort of interest in law should definitely go for it as a degree.

Anonymous

Very interesting degree. Vast range of module options that are stimulating and very challenging. Assessment is pretty much all via exams, some optional modules include dissertations and a lot of them involve a minority percentage being awarded for a coursework/extended essay usually in the region of 2,000-3,000 words.

Anonymous

Law, although very challenging in it's context, it is also very interesting and ensures you a great path to your future. Whether this is to become a lawyer (solicitor or barrister) or to become an academic, a teacher or another route which may suit you. Over your three years you will pick up analytical and creative innovation skills as well as solidifying your knowledge of the law. A very interesting topic which is full of surprises. Whether it's criminal law or contract law you will find an area which suits you and the way your brain works! It's set out into 4 module each year, with a mixture of tutorials, seminars and lectures, although a closer bond and individual sessions with a peer buddy or a personal tutor would be slightly helpful, some of your subject leaders are always happy to help too. It is rather complex and there are not many resources to help you so if you don't like the recommended text books, you are probably going to struggle, but simplifying the book down into your own notes help. You are assessed 30% by assigned and 70% by exam.

Anonymous

The LLB Law course at King's is well structured, with good introductory courses in the first year (Contract, Criminal, European Law and Public Law) and more challenging courses in the second year (Tort, Trusts and Property). Teaching is of a high standard in most modules, with the ability to meet with your lecturers and module tutors should you require individual feedback, clarification or even a reference. One formative assessment per module, per semester is offered (non-compulsory) and the speed of assessment and feedback is usually fast. In addition, for the first and second years, each compulsory module has a research essay component worth 30% of your overall grade. King's is really an international law school, offering a wide range of opportunities to study international and comparative law within modules, and also to undertake a year abroad in a wide range of countries including the US and Australia. Overall, I would definitely recommend King's for students looking to undertake a law degree. It has a diverse student body, with a large number of non-EU students and also students from poorer backgrounds within the UK. In addition, it has some of the top academics in their fields who will leave you as fascinated by their subjects as they are.

Anonymous

The LLB Law course at King's is well structured, with good introductory courses in the first year (Contract, Criminal, European Law and Public Law) and more challenging courses in the second year (Tort, Trusts and Property). Teaching is of a high standard in most modules, with the ability to meet with your lecturers and module tutors should you require individual feedback, clarification or even a reference. One formative assessment per module, per semester is offered (non-compulsory) and the speed of assessment and feedback is usually fast. In addition, for the first and second years, each compulsory module has a research essay component worth 30% of your overall grade. King's is really an international law school, offering a wide range of opportunities to study international and comparative law within modules, and also to undertake a year abroad in a wide range of countries including the US and Australia. Overall, I would definitely recommend King's for students looking to undertake a law degree. It has a diverse student body, with a large number of non-EU students and also students from poorer backgrounds within the UK. In addition, it has some of the top academics in their fields who will leave you as fascinated by their subjects as they are.

Anonymous

In this type of degree, there is virtually no spare time-from the beginning. Although lectures and contact hours are really not that many, students are expected to consistently do independent study through the reading lists and assessments provided. However, that being said if a student consistently works throughout the year there is no reason to say that they will not get a First or atleast a high 2:1. Of course, there is also the fact that a law degree is invaluable in the area of employment once the student has graduated.a

Anonymous

King's has a very reputable LLB. The undergraduate degrees are, however, a bit disorganised in my opinion. Many of the lectures take for granted your previous knowledge and ability to contextualise certain, often complex, legal concepts like equitable jurisdiction. Overall the degree is wonderful and King's has a great reputation with wonderful employment prospects, but your first year will require you to do extensive outside reading in order to genuinely keep up.

Anonymous

Firstly, the modules taught were relevant in everyday life and it could be applied in practical situations. Also, the structure of all the modules (Criminal law, contract law, European Union Law, Public Law) is such a way that it has many formative work, and the tutors in turn provide constructive feedback for improvement and encourage students to strive better in their summative essays. This, I feel, is important because it gives student better chance of scoring better marks in their exams and essays. Also, the lecturers are clear and are willing to help students who are unclear about a particular area of law, and does not show bias towards any student. Overall, my degree's structure and modules are well thought of, and allows room for students to think critically.

Anonymous

The LLM at King's College London has been a great experience thus far. Students get plenty of support. There are workshops which meet all your needs, including those on OSCOLA referencing and even dissertation workshops. There are so many module options and you also have the opportunity to shop around for modules in the first few weeks of each term before making a committed decision. There are also plenty of specialisation options. The lecturers are also very friendly despite being very well known and respected in their fields.

Anonymous

Law degrees are very intense. There is a high volume of information to take in, and very large amounts of reading. However, if you are happy and capable to keep up with this it is a very rewarding and interesting degree at most times. The career prospects are good after graduating - and I would strongly recommend doing a qualifying law degree if possible. The work load is not to be underestimated, and an ability to read quickly and carefully is essential.

Anonymous

The quality of teaching at KCL Law School is of top quality- the lecturers have an ability to really explain things well and most make it as interesting as they can. The downside of the degree is the workload; sometimes I feel they give us unnecessary work and schedule irrelevant classes i.e. seminars. which are not very useful for either exam nor the coursework. Alongside this, the administration of the Law school is terrible- we often experience problems with timetables, module selections and generally communication is poor as are the numerous technological glitches we have experienced over the course of the degree. They also mark very harshly compared to other subjects.

Anonymous

Good course structure, good tutors, interesting module selections. Plenty of formative assessments and feedback is given promptly. Graded by a final exam at the end of the year as well as a summative coursework, usually an essay.

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