BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

I currently love my biomedical science course at King's College London. As someone who loves pure science whilst also not having a clue of what area of science I would like to go into, a biomedical degree was (and still is) perfect for me. This degree is not for the faint hearted as if you don't do any work or don't turn up to lectures this, due to the demanding nature of the course, will be reflected in your marks. The teaching, in general, is very good. It's a massive plus that KCL , unlike some other major institutions, records all lectures throughout all the years of your degree - this is majorly helpful for revision. I love my degree because I love the topics I do. If you don't enjoy pure science, or are purely doing this degree just because you want to do post-grad in medicine/dentistry I would maybe reconsider.

Anonymous

The course was flexible in terms of being able to choose your own modules each year, so brilliant for those who don't know what specific area to study, or wanting a degree that is broad. I do believe the content could have been more complex, although that would have made the exams harder only due to the sheer volume of content to remember. I think the course would have benefit from more tutorials or midterm exams, to encourage students to revise and affirm knowledge throughout the course, not just before exams, to engage long term memory. More practicals and practical assessments should be introduced for every module to widen the lab skills learned by students to aid ease of obtaining a job post graduation.

Anonymous

Biomedical Science at King's College London is perhaps the most tailored, flexible degree available. The first year of the course is comprised of 7 compulsory modules, whereby some are fascinating and new (like pharmacology, cell biology, biochemistry) whereas some are unfortunately 99% repeats of A-Level material, particularly chemistry. These modules do, however, make life a lot easier to achieve higher marks in your first year.For the second and third years however, you have a free range of modules that cover subjects all across the biomedical spectrum. Endocrinology, microbiology, embryology, neuropharmacology - King's offers a plethora of very specific and interesting modules that go hand in hand with all the key biomedical sciences they offer: pharmacology, neuroscience, biochemistry, anatomy.The course is taught excellently, although there are some modules are naturally taught better than others. There is a fair amount of transparency whereby when selecting your modules in yrs 2 and 3, you are able to view feedback from previous student's on modules you may be interested in. The university encourages informed decisions and provides neverending support with career prospects.

Anonymous

Biomedical science is a degree tailored to your choice. It provides you with a range of skills and offers a great deal of module choices to choose from. With your own choices you get to build your own timetable and allows you to independently organise your time at university. Choices vary from molecular biology, physiology, anatomy, to pharmacology, genetics and project design. Kings provides accessibility to module pages in which outline the course structure and content.

Anonymous

Ok so first year is way too intense especially For those who have just left sixth from. With there being 400 of us I don't feel like we got the support we needed just in terms of being told what is expected of you. Furthermore you have MCQS for exams. The rest of your degree is assessed by essays but you have MCQS in first year why ?!? This gives you no preparation for the rest of your degree. Second year is better as you actually get to choose your modules as apposed to first year however for biomed I don't think there is enough variety. Also again not enough interesting 30 credit modules which leaves you picking 15 credits and having crazy amounts of exams. Also 30 credits require way more than 2 X 15 credits would. Also what is with the crazy number of courseworks that take forever to prepare for and are worth 2% and 5% I kid you not. Also the amount of content for anatomy is just a joke. Also not enough support in general at uni or career advice. They've taken do your own thing a bit to seriously.

Anonymous

Biomedical science at king's has given me the greatest choice and flexibility to study what interests me most. Unlike other biomed courses from year 2 onwards king's allows you total choice over the modules you study which allows me to study the areas I want to such as anatomy, physiology and neuroscience and avoid areas I'm not so keen on such as genetics and biochemistry!The resources at king's are outstanding - the libraries are modern and have all the facilities you could ever need and the labs are state of the art. I have had access to cadaver material in both my anatomy and neuroscience courses which is a great privilege and a valuable learning tool.I have throughly enjoyed my time so far at king's and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in biomedical science but wants to have more freedom with their degree.

Anonymous

I have found my experience studying biomedical science at KCL so far to be a very positive one. While the course is very intense and challenging, I have enjoyed having the freedom to choose my own modules in year 2, and for year 3. This means I have been able to focus my studies on areas which I consider to be my strengths and which interest me the most, which I feel has helped me in deciding possible future careers after graduating. I have also found the resources at KCL to be of the highest standard. The libraries are well equipped with modern facilities and we are lucky enough to have access to human tissue, such as cadavers and brain specimens which help enormously with learning and understanding of anatomy. While assessments are copious and intense, I believe they have helped to consolidate my learning and allowed me to decide what areas of bioscience I like and those I dislike.

Anonymous

My degree is Biomedical Science (3yrs).The course content itself is very interesting and covers wide variety of aspects from chemistry, pharmacology, genetics, biochemistry to physiology in the first year.Second year we were allowed to choose more specific modules. Since i enjoyed genetics and pharmacology second year, i chose human molecular genetics and drugs and disease. I also chose immune system, microbiology, stem cells and embryology. Most lecturers weren't great though, although the content itself was interesting, the teaching method wasnt. There was no enthusiasm put in for the lectures....especially for microbiology. The teaching for stem cells wasnt that great either, the lectures were full of pictures with no to little text and it was unfortunate that we couldnt understand the lecturer's accent.Pharmacology and embryology was delivered pretty good, lecture content was pretty concise.Immune system had the most interesting content and i really enjoyed studying for this module.I would say embryology was the most complex module but once you got your head around it, it was the most easiest.Forms of assessment for all the modules included coursework in the first semester and an exam in May.My favourite modules this year were embryology and stem cells (development biology).Overall this course is very interesting and i highly recommend it. Hopefully the teaching style will improve in near future as this course holds great promise.

Anonymous

Biomedical Science is a very enjoyable and useful degree for those who have a passion for the human body and the miracles of science. It is a very broad course, especially during the first year. For the first year, students from a few different but similar courses (e.g. Neuroscience) are put together to form Common Year One. There are 7 compulsory modules, which offers a great variety of material being taught and learnt.The modules all vary in their assessment, but all 7 modules have a 2 hours exam at the end of the year. Some modules, for example the Molecular Genetics module has in course assessments in the form of coursework. Each module also varies in how many (if any) practicals take place.After learning some material, knowledge is tested through workshops and tutorials, for which students answer questions based on the relevant learnt material, and then attend specific sessions to go through those questions and answers. These sessions are great to clear up any queries and ask questions on material which isn't fully understood.The online resources are extremely helpful and very well organised. Each module has it's own sub-section on the online Virtual Campus. The FAQ facility is of great help for students looking for help on something they do not understand. Members of the teaching faculty answer the questions very promptly and also provide references to textbooks if extra clarification is needed.The course is challenging, but very rewarding. There is a lot of support available, and the teaching is great!

Anonymous

I fully enjoy my degree and love the fact that I can tailor it to what I like and find interesting in all of the varied fields of biomedical sciences.It's perfect for people like me who aren't sure what modules they prefer or what exactly they want to do in ten years time. It allows for the student to sample anything that sounds good whilst leaving the opportunity to change your degree to something more specific if at the end of the first year - or indeed second - you find yourself more drawn to a certain module (into Neuroscience for example).

Anonymous

The content & structure of the course allows for greater freedom to pursue a wide variety of subjects. The teaching is enjoyable. The assessments are challenging but not impossible. They help develop oral, written and oratory skills.

Anonymous

For anyone who is slightly unsure on exactly what scientific path to follow, this degree is perfect as after a common first year, you are able to design a degree that's right for you due to total flexibility of module choices. From biochemistry to anatomy to neuroscience, as long as you stick to core modules you can even change your degree title to a more specialised one at the end of year two. With regards to the teaching, lecture capture is a brilliant tool and I feel privileged to have had access to such amazing facilities- especially regarding anatomy.

Anonymous

I feel as though the common year one is helpful because it allows life science students to have one more year before rhey decide to specialise in one degree subject, but in order to keep our interest there should be specialised tutorials in the degree we have enrolled in, otherwise we spend the year studying for modules that we do not enjoy. However the tutorials we do have and the problem solving workshops are good opportunities for us to raise issues on the work that we are doing nonetheless.

Anonymous

This degree is excellent for those who have a passion for science and really want to explore further into the small details of both biology and chemistry. It isn't without its challenges though, as examinations can be quite difficult but the experience as a whole makes it worth it. The course mixes well lecture content with practicals and coursework and the lecture recording facility made it so that I could re-watch my lectures months later when exam season was coming up, this was a crucial part of my revision so i found it very useful. Overall I would highly recommend this course and there was very little wrong with it.

Anonymous

The degree is good if you are not sure what you want to do in the future. The degree leaves you in good stead to pursue further education or a career in the bio sciences. The course is very general and in the later years you have the chance to pick modules which are more specialised such as in neuroscience or physiology. You also have the option to change to a degree course of a similar more specialised field without having to redo the first general year.

Anonymous

I have just finished my first year of this degree and enjoy 95% of it! In terms of content, the first year of BioMed at KCL is called Common Year One as there are about 450 students who study similar things (a mix of BioChem students, Neuroscience, Pharmacologists, etc...) so we all partake in the same modules for the first year which is nice (especially if you are BioMed as you can essentially choose what you learn in Years 2 and 3) to gain an understanding and appreciation of what you enjoy and are good at. In terms of difficulty, obviously some aspects are hard but quite a bit of it is built up from knowledge obtained at A-Levels. Assessments were mostly exams with a few pieces of coursework (which is vital for increasing my grade this year, as I didn't realise the step up from A-Levels until mid through the year). All in all, I met some amazing people this year, friendly professors and am in love with my campus.

Anonymous

A degree perfect for you if you love the medical sciences, but are not 100% sure within which discipline you want to launch your career. The first year gives a great overview of multiple medical sciences like chemistry, biology, neuroscience, pharmacology, genetics, etc. You also have full choice in which modules to choose for year 2 and 3. Teaching is mainly through lectures, which is expected considered the amount of knowledge you need to "absorb". I would greatly recommend the course as it fits me quite well, but that might not apply to everyone. The course requires a fair bit of motivation as you need to review what you learn in lectures in your own time. If you don't, you'll struggle to cope with the amount of knowledge. You need to have a strong interest for the medical sciences, and if you don't I'd advise you look elsewhere because you simply won't enjoy the course. It is also worth noting that there are very man lab hours as well which are extremely interesting!

Anonymous

As an international student, I may say that this program is good. However, in my opinion the name is misleading because this degree is completely scientific and does not involve any medicine. Also, you will not be able to transfer to medicine until you finish the degree. I would definitely recommend it to people, who want to do do research afterwards or to those who want to work in the science related business.Secondly, this is very important! This degree is NOT accredited which means that without further training you will NOT be able to work as an NHS scientist.Another very important point is that the first year is called Common Year 1. This is because everyone doing any biomedical science related degree gets to do the same exact modules. Therefore you get to try everything and at the end you can decide to stay and do BSc in Biomedical science or transfer to another program that is more specific.

Anonymous

A science degree with practical applications. During the first year you are taught with science students from other disciplines, which increases the breadth of the content. The course is pretty flexible as there are no compulsory modules after the first year and you are free to tailor it to your interests (often based on what you enjoyed in the first year). Teaching is based on lectures with workshops and tutorials in small groups. This is often very helpful as you get a lot of personal attention and staff are willing to clarify anything you do not understand. Workshops encourage you to deal with applied problems one step at a time based on what you learned in lectures. You will also do group work with your tutorial group. This course encourages you to work through complex problems step by step, applying the content covered in lectures so you get a chance to go over things. Practicals are interactive and encourage "hands on learning" (e.g. seeing the human body up close in dissections). Assessment is in the form of coursework and exams. There are midsessionals after the first semester which means you spend some part of Christmas recapping what you learnt. This should reduce the need for cramming before exams in the summer! Feedback for coursework is clear and detailed with points you can improve on for next time and is often returned to you within two weeks of submission. The course is enjoyable if you like breadth and applying your knowledge so it isn't just confined to the lecture theatre!

Anonymous

The degree covers Biology and Chemistry from a medical perspective. The structure consists of a high proportion of lectures, a substantial amount of workshops and tutorials in addition to compulsory practicals. Emphasis is placed on the human body; the biological pathways, biochemical reactions and the anatomy and physiology of it. Forms of assessment include: exams, online tests, essays, write ups, reviews etc. I definitely find it to be a stimulating learning atmosphere. Although the content can be sometimes overwhelming and challenging, I am really enjoying my degree and the modules I do.

Anonymous

I really like the first year of my degree as it is a common year one of the biosciences. This means that at the end of the year we have the opportunity to change our course, meaning that we don't have to choose our speciality until we have had more time to make up our mind of our career path. Our course structure is very broad which makes it interesting giving us the opportunity to study human anatomy, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, molecular genetics, cell biology and neuroscience. The career support we get is good with there being professional skill programmes offered, as well as the opportunity to broaden our transferable skills by taking part in the numerous clubs and societies that there are on offer. The majority of our professors and academics are experts in their fields with textbooks being written by them, many lecturers are passionate. The only thing I can say I have a problem with is that there are not enough IT facilities,and the personal tutor system needs fixing as it does little in its current state.

Anonymous

Biomedical Science is a degree of choice at kings after a first year of core module (really important if you want get how the body works as a whole) you get absolute choice in second and third year with your modules. You can pick any subject, there's a wide variety in term of content (from hardcore science to social topics) but also teaching styles (lab, lectures, project, research...). Basically it's amazing if you don't know what you want to later and you want more time to think (research. Medic. Finance. Industry.) KCL is a really good uni: perfect is you want to meet people from all over the world that are genuinely intersting, good locations in london, very consistent quality of teaching. The worst feature is the administration which is mostly awful to deal with. Overall you're gonna have fun, learn cool stuff that you chose and get a nice degree from a world renommed uni.

Anonymous

Biomedical Science is a degree of choice at kings after a first year of core module (really important if you want get how the body works as a whole) you get absolute choice in second and third year with your modules. You can pick any subject, there's a wide variety in term of content (from hardcore science to social topics) but also teaching styles (lab, lectures, project, research...). Basically it's amazing if you don't know what you want to later and you want more time to think (research. Medic. Finance. Industry.) KCL is a really good uni: perfect is you want to meet people from all over the world that are genuinely intersting, good locations in london, very consistent quality of teaching. The worst feature is the administration which is mostly awful to deal with. Overall you're gonna have fun, learn cool stuff that you chose and get a nice degree from a world renommed uni.

Anonymous

The course is highly organised .students who miss the lectures have access to Lecture Captures to go over the lectures on their own time. There are services provided that students could ask their questions on virtual campus and receive the answers as soon as possible. The whole teaching system has a high technology.however, i personally think the overall load of course works and lectures are too high to catch up with. sometimes PSWs or tutorials are pointless as the teacher is not well knowledged about the subject.

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