MEng (Hons) Civil Engineering

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

The course gives a very good, broad understanding of civil engineering and we had the opportunity to choose our specialisation area from a large range of disciplines (structures, soils, fluids, transport, project management, etc).I feel that the course is quite successful at developing the necessary skills whether you want to stay in engineering or move to the management or business side of things.Most of the teachers are nice and approachable.There are a few areas the course could be improved on, however. Though it would be useful to know a bit of basic programming, very little is being taught, other than Matlab. There are basically no elective modules until the final year, even though most people know by the end of second year which disciplines they want to specialise in. Also, there are hardly any small group tutorials.

Anonymous

The course is very challenging and by the end of the second year you acquire knowledge that is actually used in industry giving meaning to the learning. Constructionarium also gives you skills in the contractual side of engineering which is really helpful.

Anonymous

My degree is challenging due to the high workload and complexity of the content. In the first year, the basics of a civil engineer's bread and butter is covered, including introductions to structural and geotechnical (soil mechanics) engineering and fluid mechanics along with a refresher mathematics course. Other modules include more discursive yet important ones such as energy systems and environmental engineering. The second year expands the basic knowledge attained in the first year on structural, geotechnical and fluid mechanics modules and also offers a more challenging mathematics module. Statistics is also introduced. The highlight of the year is definitely the week-long construction trip in the last week of term where you get to put theory into practice and build something of your own! The third and fourth years include their fair share of theory modules as in the first and second years, but this time with the addition of exciting group projects and individual projects. In these projects you get to use all knowledge and experience gained from prior years to produce some work of your own. Overall, I think this course is challenging but very rewarding and fun, the staff are great, the teaching is great and the togetherness created from groups such as CivSoc is even better!

Anonymous

the course at Imperial is very constructive and informative, although not as technical as I have expected. It provides courses on a wide range of topics, allowing students to gain extensive knowledge on different areas in civil engineering. I particularly like the design projects and field trips that took place every year as I think that they are very practical in terms of putting your knowledge into practice. The learning environment is also very encouraging, with very helpful and professional academics. However, the courseworks can be sometimes very demanding as we lack prior knowledge, and the exams for certain topics are quite difficult as well because what was examined was totally different to what we were taught. Students may lack free time to join clubs and societies, despite there are hundreds available. I believe the best part is to meet many friends who are like-minded and can share common interests.

Anonymous

Civil engineering at Imperial is highly challenging course in comparison to similar courses at other universities. Had I known just how much a student is expected to work at Imperial I may have considered a different university. The benefit of completing the course, however, is large range of skills that other students will not have. Its extremely beneficial when working in top tier firms.

Anonymous

First, second, third and fourth year are worth one ninths, two ninths, a third and a third (respectively) of the course. The first year is mainly theoretical knowledge and gradually the modules become more practical. For example, in second year modules become available where you actually design structures, as opposed to just analyse them. All modules in the first two years are mandatory. We are allowed two optional modules in the third year (one module per term). Our final (fourth) year consists entirely of optional modules. You do not have complete freedom to choose your modules in fourth year though, as the modules are categorised and you must choose one from each category. The lack of freedom to choose modules in the earlier years can sometimes feel quite frustrating as there are naturally some modules you do not enjoy. This set up would make sense if all the modules were core modules, however as civil engineering is such a broad subject, I do not think this is the case. There is plenty of group work throughout the degree, some in groups chosen for you and others when you choose your own group. These projects are often very well run and enjoyable. They provide useful opportunities to interact with different members of your class and of course, they develop good team work and leadership skills.

Anonymous

The course is a very difficult course as the material we cover may even include certain MSc modules, but extremely rewarding at the end of it. It is very well designed as it exposes you to all facades of civil engineering, from consultancy to contractor and research. This allows us to be able to understand problems from various perspectives, and help us to be better engineers in the field.

Anonymous

The civil engineering course at Imperial is no doubt very challenging but it is intellectually stimulating. Coursework is in abundance, meaning you hardly have free time to relax without having work on the back of your mind. The subjects can be quite tough with some lectures being difficult to understand. But I suppose this is the same for any course. At least at Imperial, you get the sense that you are getting a great civil engineering education, which makes the hectic schedule more acceptable. That being said, the projects, field trips and coursework are actually enjoyable and provide great experience for work and internships. The brand name of the University itself does lend a helping hand to your employability.

Anonymous

I think overall the degree is very technical. We do a lot of designs and calculations but have very little chance to see it being implemented. We also use very advanced programming languages that might not be useful when we step into the working world. However, the lecturers are the best part of my degree. They are all very helpful and knowledgeable; some even thought me life lessons that I will not forget all my life. I really enjoy my degree!

Anonymous

The workload is not high if you manage your time well. There is plenty of free time to join clubs and societies AND still study / complete assignments, so do take some time off to enjoy your university life. Overall, good quality of teaching, there are occasional boring lectures but no school is perfect. Assignments are mainly in-class work, though not exclusively so. For those who can't manage your time as efficiently, this is great, because you basically have a blocked out day/week to complete the assignment.

Anonymous

I learn the mathematical side of the course better, so I've had better experience in maths, mechanics and programming modules. In particular, there have been two maths lecturers, one on calculus and the other on matrices. The one on calculus has been excellent, the other, not so much. Our current programming lectures are about computational matrices, though I heard he is a newcomer, I think his lectures and tutorials are pretty good. I, however, enjoyed much less with the wordy side of the course, including Environmental engineering, geology, energy systems and materials, the worst has to be geology because the lecturer spoke too fast and too much at once, and the notes is a dense mess of words. I am a more mathematical person, so take that as you will.

Anonymous

Regarding the MEng Civil Engineering Course, I can happily admit that I am very satisfied with the course. The content is quite interesting, intellectually stimulating and we are taught by high-profile experts in their fields, in other words, the quality of a material delivery is very high. Studying at Imperial also give a decent potential for my future career.

Anonymous

I really like how my degree is taught as I think it is as theoretical as practical. Lecturers are all passionate about their subject and do everything they can to help us. We can clearly see that their aim is our success which really helps, mostly for international students.

Anonymous

The course is difficult, with a lot of content and material to learn, as well as having a large amount of coursework. It is unparalleled for research opportunities and good teaching, and if you really enjoy Civil Engineering, there's no better place to be. However, if you struggle with Maths or don't feel that it is a good course for you, do not come in.

Anonymous

Course covers a broad range of useful topics, whilst allowing to specialize in areas of interest in the 3rd and 4th year.Emphasis on not only learning academic material, but group work, creative designs, as well as project work.Great lecturers who care for the students