MBBS (Hons) Medicine

Review Breakdown

Course / Module Content
Teaching Quality
Learning Resources
Assessments & Feedback
Academic Support
Enjoyment Factor

Reviews

Anonymous

The Medicine degree at Imperial College London is exceptional. It is very well taught, and there is a lot of academic and pastoral support. I would highly recommend coming to Imperial to study Medicine.

Anonymous

Great teaching overall, though little support for students in terms of small group teaching/tutorials. When they do happen, however, they are of excellent quality. Would like more assessments/coursework during the year rather than only final exams.Good clinical application of studies and clinical skills are taught from early on.

Anonymous

Imperial undergraduate medicine is a traditional medical course whereby you do both preclinical and clinical medicine separately. It's a long and tough 6 years but unlike other schools, it is all exam based rather than regular essays, projects or otherwise. Which gives you much more scope to manage your time effectively. There is a lot of competition between students but ultimately this drives everyone on to greater things and Imperial has a reputation as a result.

Anonymous

Good structure and course content. First and second year are really hard work and information heavy. Exams. Are tough but manageable. Patient contact from first year with patient home visits. Third year all clinical great at some hospitals others not as great. Plenty of variety in learning. New gp placement really great for learning toward exams. Forth year compulsory Bsc not a huge Amount of choice yet to find out if it's well taught. Final 2 years clinical with finals in march on 6th year followed by elective. The only issue is this app has a lot to be on my iPhone to be able and the app will not work with app as it has to do for a good reason for a good game but it has great graphics for the game but this game has been a good app to play for the game but I am able for this app and the game app to have a good app but it is a great app for a great app but this game has been great to be on app but it is a good game but I have been a good app with a good game but it is great for a the app that and the game.

Anonymous

Imperial medicine is fantastic. Compared to other universities our resources are great! There are so many tutoring schemes - peer tutoring is very big at imperial! Also, Imperial gives us excellent resources in our clinical years. Having spoken to medical students at other London universities they seem to have to do a lot more independent learning. Clinical skills tutoring at Imperial is great. We have clinical teaching fellows with dedicated time weekly to teach us clinical skills. Students at other universities have to learn this stuff themselves on the wards.Think also that Imperial's teaching hospitals are all London hospitals. These are competitive hospitals that attract the best doctors in the fields, so you are receiving teaching from doctors top of their field.Top university. World class teaching. You will get a BSc from this course also, putting you ahead of others when you apply during your foundation years. Have greatly enjoyed my BSc year here. Very interesting and lots of opportunities for research! Many people get publications out of their BSc years! Publications look great on future applications as well!

Anonymous

I worked very hard to be able to be here studying medicine and it superseded my expectations. Not only is there a variety of interesting topics in lectures, there are also specific times to visit the hospitals and practice what you are learning.I enjoy the style of learning with lectures and then tutorials to back our understanding. However they are seldom done due to the lack of turnout in some of the tutorials meaning it would not be feasible.The exams are right at the end of the course, with not much during term time that counts to your final grade, which is probably why people think medics have it easy! It's mostly about the sprint of revision near the summer. I wouldn't mind if we had an exam maybe before Christmas to reduce the load we have over the summer!Overall I enjoy the experience of going to university and enjoy the variety and independence studying medicine brings.

Anonymous

Medicine at Imperial is a challenging but a rewarding degree. There is a great variety in terms of teaching methods, e.g. lectures, lots of different tutorials, practicals, living anatomy sessions, dissection and of course clinical placement and an emphasis on e-learning (we get free iPad minis!) so there is a wide range of ways to learn the content. But of course, medicine is a difficult degree generally with a very large workload, which can be very stressful.

Anonymous

Medicine at Imperial is a well-structured course that provides opportunities to develop on a personal and professional level. The course covers six years of teaching that equip students with the skills they need to be successful doctors. Some subjects are better taught than others but overall the standard of teaching is high.

Anonymous

Imperial is a top class university and the course and lecturers live up to this expectation. The latest research is taught. It is a very challenging and competitive environment to learn in which can be pretty stressful. Social life is great amongst the medics but there is a rivalry with the main university

Anonymous

I have really enjoyed the way the course is structured- the first term was very science based but this provided a good foundation to understand the more clinical focussed modules of terms 2 and 3. I enjoyed dissection because we were given the freedom to really explore the anatomy that had been taught to us earlier that day- this meant that the content quickly manifested in our minds after teaching. It was really nice to be matched to a patient who we visited regularly in order to understand what it feels like to be a patient. The option to join paediatric society and visit the wards of St Mary's hospital meant that I could have even more patient exposure if I wanted. The older students are incredibly helpful as a source of notes and exam preparation- you are never alone!

Anonymous

Studying medicine is tough but definitely you'll enjoy it especially when you start the clinical years (year 3 and above). Also, at Imperial College you are given the chance to do an MSc in one year which is a great addition to your future career and to your CV!So, I recommend this course for the sixth form student who are still undecided on what study.

Anonymous

As a 6 year degree, the Medicine course at Imperial also involves intercalating in 4th year. It is taught in a very traditional fashion, and is very lecture intense compared to medical degrees at other universities in the first 2 preclinical years (a lot of days of 9-5!). Anatomy is taught with full cadaveric dissection (Y1) and prosection (Y2), which is good for learning, although one thing to note is that anatomy teaching is notoriously poor at Imperial comparative to other universities.Teaching is otherwise good, although the course is very complex and goes into a lot more detail than other medical schools (good for some not for others!). Assessments are mainly exams at the end of the year, which means it's easy to get caught up relaxing throughout the year and leaving yourself with too much to do near exam time, which is a common reason for students failing.

Anonymous

First year Medicine at imperial includes 5 main modules which are further subdivided: MCD, LSS, FoCP, LCRS and PBL. MCD= molecules cells and diseases. LSS= life support systems. FoCP= foundation of clinical practice. LCRS= life cycles and regulatory systems. These modules cover the typical/ expected areas such as anatomy, body systems e.g. Cardio and some PBL cases. Clinical communication was one area I didn't think we would visit so early on in medicine but I found it so useful to start practicing some of the skills we need when interacting with patients. Our assessments this year were mostly written assessments: multiple choice qs, short answers qs, etc. Teaching included lectures, tutorials, practicals/lab sessions, PBL.

Anonymous

Deciding to do medicine was a difficult one. I'd heard many things from both sides, but Imperial has honestly made this degree so enjoyable; that I don't have to FORCE myself to revise, I simply do it because I love the subject and want to know more.

Anonymous

No doubt medicine is a rigorous and demanding course that not only stimulates you on an intellectual level, but also an emotional one. The first 2 years of medical school are very much lecture-based and focus on acquiring the foundations of medical knowledge ie. biology, chemistry and physics. This can seem mundane and boring at time but you soon realise that if you don't have a good grasp of the basics, then the more advanced material becomes a challenge. The next phase of your studies consists of clinical attachments at hospitals in which you rotate around different specialities and gain experience of what it's like to work in them. This is where you come into your own and you really start to feel like a medical student. You have responsibilities within a hospital team to deliver simple treatments and pieces of advice to patients and you learn to art of examining patients in order to reach a diagnosis. For me, this has been the most rewarding experience so far and the one which I have thoroughly enjoyed. You meet a lot of people, both patients and healthcare professional and in this way you learn how to communicate at the level of different individuals. It can be challenging at times as doctors are often very busy and patients can be anxious and worried, but there's no greater satisfaction than going home at the end of the day knowing that you have made a difference to someone's life, even if it is in small capacity as a medical student. These are the moments you won't forget in life.

Anonymous

The medicine course is taught by clinicians and scientists at the top of their field in exciting and varied ways. There is a mixture of lectures, tutorials, experiments, dissections, surface anatomy lessons and communication skills seminars, as well as opportunities to experience the clinical side of medicine early on. The hospitals affiliated with the university are world renowned, and are excellent centres to hone your clinical skills in year 3, 5 and 6. The BSc done in year 4 offers students to explore an area of medicine that they particularly enjoy, or even try something new like the business management course. The forms of assessment in years 1 and 2 involve exams that include multiple choice questions and short written questions. As you progress through the university, practical skills are assessed. Overall, this course is incredibly enjoyable, the people are very welcoming, and the university offers a wide range of clubs and societies to be involved in.

Anonymous

Medicine at Imperial is a long degree, which takes 6 years to complete both the MBBS and BSc intercalation sections. Admission is dependent on high A Level grades, BMAT score and a commitment to gain work experience, voluntary experience and a broad range of extra-curricular activities. During the first 2 years, you'll learn pre-clinical medicine through lectures and laboratory sessions, before stepping onto the wards for clinical medicine in years 3, 5 and 6. Year 4 gives you the opportunity to take a research degree in a scientific field within biomedicine, for example Neuroscience or Immunology, which is intense but broadens your skill set for future work in academic medicine. Finally you'll complete placements in the core medical specialties and have the chance to undertake an elective internationally.

Anonymous

Our degree is very interesting and vocational. However our length of holidays varies too much from year to year. Our multiple choice style exams are good as they remove any potential subjective and unreliable marking. Our degree is six years long which is expensive but it is very enjoyable overall

Anonymous

It's awesome, I've met patients so far and enjoyed talking to them. We develop our conversational skills alongside our more technical scientific ones. I would prefer more tutorials, but a lot of societies do this for us and I'm very grateful.

Anonymous

I enjoy the course. There is a lot of lectures throughout the year. There are a few PBL (problem based learning) sessions, which before applying to the uni I thought this would be my preferred learning platform. However after this year I disagree as I find it difficult to learn from others. The anatomy sessions are somewhat useful, a lot more of the work is done yourself though. Also, although the structure is mostly okay, the exams and deadlines could be more spread out throughout the year rather than all at once at each end of term.

Anonymous

Imperial is a very good University of you are looking not just for professional development but also personal development. Opportunities are endless, and

Anonymous

The course itself is needless to say provides some excellent opportunities for learning, though there are some room for improvement. However, what really astonishes me and makes me value the course more than I already do is the relationship we have as students with the faculty. The faculty always looks to communicate with us, involving us in important decisions through feedback and there's a real sense that they really do value us! Our students' (ICSM) union also has a pivotol role, as one of the strongest students across the UK and the feeling of community and friendship it provides within the whole studentbody is also one of the main reason why I have grown to adore and enjoy my life as a medical student here at Imperial.

Anonymous

The content of the course is well organised. The structure is divided into topics which are studies in more depth in the next year. It includes not only lectures it also group work where you get to contribute more and build on ideas which in my oppinion is great. The teaching encourages students to think for themselves and also ask questions. The form of assessment although can be tough, they are are fair. The part of the course that could be improved in my oppinion is the anatomy learning which could be taught in a more organised manner. Overall, the course have been very enjoyable.

Anonymous

Excellent course structure. Feedback is listened to and acted upon and the course structure is such that your knowledge should be quite good before you interact with patients. The format of the course is also good with lecture aided by pbl to ensure you should understand course material.

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